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Evolution of disability in late 19th century America: Civil War pensions for Union Army veterans with musculoskeletal conditions

This article examines the evolution of musculoskeletal (MSK) disability and its impact on mortality and work patterns in the late 19th century in America, in the context of the Civil War disability policy scheme. The study was conducted on 17,702 Union Army (UA) Civil War veterans. Of these, 10,789... Full description

Journal Title: Behavioral Sciences & the Law November 2002, Vol.20(6), pp.681-697
Main Author: Blanck, Peter
Other Authors: Linares, Claudia , Song, Chen
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0735-3936 ; E-ISSN: 1099-0798 ; DOI: 10.1002/bsl.508
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recordid: wj10.1002/bsl.508
title: Evolution of disability in late 19th century America: Civil War pensions for Union Army veterans with musculoskeletal conditions
format: Article
creator:
  • Blanck, Peter
  • Linares, Claudia
  • Song, Chen
subjects:
  • Disabled Persons
  • Musculoskeletal Diseases
  • Pensions
  • Social Welfare
  • Veterans
  • Veterans Disability Claims
ispartof: Behavioral Sciences & the Law, November 2002, Vol.20(6), pp.681-697
description: This article examines the evolution of musculoskeletal (MSK) disability and its impact on mortality and work patterns in the late 19th century in America, in the context of the Civil War disability policy scheme. The study was conducted on 17,702 Union Army (UA) Civil War veterans. Of these, 10,789 were examined and diagnosed with major MSK conditions, rheumatism, sciatica, and spinal curvature, between 1862 and 1907. Analyses examine MSK (i) prevalence rates by birth cohort and age group; (ii) fatality rates as compared with other disabilities; (iii) risk rates by occupation type; and (iv) lifespan for MSK patients. MSK conditions are commonly claimed disabilities within the Civil War data set, with prevalence rates increasing with age. Regression studies show that working in clerical and professional (relative to manual labor) occupations decreases the likelihood of being examined for and diagnosed with MSK conditions. MSK patients examined at older ages tended to have longer lifespan than those examined at younger ages. The findings suggest that changes in age, environmental, and occupational conditions during the late 19th century affected MSK condition prevalence and the average lifespan of MSK patients. Implications for contemporary disability policy are discussed. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0735-3936 ; E-ISSN: 1099-0798 ; DOI: 10.1002/bsl.508
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0735-3936
  • 07353936
  • 1099-0798
  • 10990798
url: Link


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titleEvolution of disability in late 19th century America: Civil War pensions for Union Army veterans with musculoskeletal conditions
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descriptionThis article examines the evolution of musculoskeletal (MSK) disability and its impact on mortality and work patterns in the late 19th century in America, in the context of the Civil War disability policy scheme. The study was conducted on 17,702 Union Army (UA) Civil War veterans. Of these, 10,789 were examined and diagnosed with major MSK conditions, rheumatism, sciatica, and spinal curvature, between 1862 and 1907. Analyses examine MSK (i) prevalence rates by birth cohort and age group; (ii) fatality rates as compared with other disabilities; (iii) risk rates by occupation type; and (iv) lifespan for MSK patients. MSK conditions are commonly claimed disabilities within the Civil War data set, with prevalence rates increasing with age. Regression studies show that working in clerical and professional (relative to manual labor) occupations decreases the likelihood of being examined for and diagnosed with MSK conditions. MSK patients examined at older ages tended to have longer lifespan than those examined at younger ages. The findings suggest that changes in age, environmental, and occupational conditions during the late 19th century affected MSK condition prevalence and the average lifespan of MSK patients. Implications for contemporary disability policy are discussed. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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titleEvolution of disability in late 19th century America: Civil War pensions for Union Army veterans with musculoskeletal conditions
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abstractThis article examines the evolution of musculoskeletal (MSK) disability and its impact on mortality and work patterns in the late 19th century in America, in the context of the Civil War disability policy scheme. The study was conducted on 17,702 Union Army (UA) Civil War veterans. Of these, 10,789 were examined and diagnosed with major MSK conditions, rheumatism, sciatica, and spinal curvature, between 1862 and 1907. Analyses examine MSK (i) prevalence rates by birth cohort and age group; (ii) fatality rates as compared with other disabilities; (iii) risk rates by occupation type; and (iv) lifespan for MSK patients. MSK conditions are commonly claimed disabilities within the Civil War data set, with prevalence rates increasing with age. Regression studies show that working in clerical and professional (relative to manual labor) occupations decreases the likelihood of being examined for and diagnosed with MSK conditions. MSK patients examined at older ages tended to have longer lifespan than those examined at younger ages. The findings suggest that changes in age, environmental, and occupational conditions during the late 19th century affected MSK condition prevalence and the average lifespan of MSK patients. Implications for contemporary disability policy are discussed. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
copChichester, UK
pubJohn Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
doi10.1002/bsl.508
pages681-697
date2002-11