schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Subjective memory impairment in older adults: aetiology, salience and help seeking

Subjective memory impairment (SMI) is one of the key symptoms with which people with early cognitive impairment may present to health services. However, little research has investigated how older people view the symptom, its salience and how often help is sought. The objectives were to investigate (... Full description

Journal Title: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry June 2012, Vol.27(6), pp.612-620
Main Author: Begum, Aysha
Other Authors: Morgan, Craig , Chiu, Chih‐Chiang , Tylee, Andre , Stewart, Robert
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language:
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0885-6230 ; E-ISSN: 1099-1166 ; DOI: 10.1002/gps.2760
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: wj10.1002/gps.2760
title: Subjective memory impairment in older adults: aetiology, salience and help seeking
format: Article
creator:
  • Begum, Aysha
  • Morgan, Craig
  • Chiu, Chih‐Chiang
  • Tylee, Andre
  • Stewart, Robert
subjects:
  • Subjective Memory Impairment
  • Memory Complaints
  • Primary Care
  • Memory Service
  • Help Seeking
  • Epidemiology
  • Salience
ispartof: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, June 2012, Vol.27(6), pp.612-620
description: Subjective memory impairment (SMI) is one of the key symptoms with which people with early cognitive impairment may present to health services. However, little research has investigated how older people view the symptom, its salience and how often help is sought. The objectives were to investigate (a) factors associated with SMI, (b) salience of SMI in comparison with other symptoms and (c) help seeking for SMI. A cross-sectional survey was based in two Primary Care services in south London in which registered people aged 65+ were interviewed blind to the study objectives. Measurements included systematic ascertainment of SMI and other common symptoms/disorders. In each of these, concern and interference were quantified, and participants were asked to rank all reported symptoms/disorders in order of importance. Of 126 participants, any SMI was reported in 66.7%, and 31.0% reported SMI to a significant degree. SMI occupied a middling rank in terms of salience, being ranked as more concerning than angina, asthma, hypertension or a previous heart attack in around half of participants in whom these co-occurred. However, only one participant with SMI had sought help from their GP, making it the least likely symptom to be reported. Subjective memory impairment is common and appears to have functional and/or emotional significance for many older people. However, very few appear to seek medical attention for this symptom, which has implications for wider policy regarding prompt assessment and diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment or dementia.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0885-6230 ; E-ISSN: 1099-1166 ; DOI: 10.1002/gps.2760
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0885-6230
  • 08856230
  • 1099-1166
  • 10991166
url: Link


@attributes
ID130036974
RANK0.06999999
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid10.1002/gps.2760
sourceidwj
recordidTN_wj10.1002/gps.2760
sourcesystemPC
pqid1008840547
display
typearticle
titleSubjective memory impairment in older adults: aetiology, salience and help seeking
creatorBegum, Aysha ; Morgan, Craig ; Chiu, Chih‐Chiang ; Tylee, Andre ; Stewart, Robert
ispartofInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, June 2012, Vol.27(6), pp.612-620
identifier
subjectSubjective Memory Impairment ; Memory Complaints ; Primary Care ; Memory Service ; Help Seeking ; Epidemiology ; Salience
source
descriptionSubjective memory impairment (SMI) is one of the key symptoms with which people with early cognitive impairment may present to health services. However, little research has investigated how older people view the symptom, its salience and how often help is sought. The objectives were to investigate (a) factors associated with SMI, (b) salience of SMI in comparison with other symptoms and (c) help seeking for SMI. A cross-sectional survey was based in two Primary Care services in south London in which registered people aged 65+ were interviewed blind to the study objectives. Measurements included systematic ascertainment of SMI and other common symptoms/disorders. In each of these, concern and interference were quantified, and participants were asked to rank all reported symptoms/disorders in order of importance. Of 126 participants, any SMI was reported in 66.7%, and 31.0% reported SMI to a significant degree. SMI occupied a middling rank in terms of salience, being ranked as more concerning than angina, asthma, hypertension or a previous heart attack in around half of participants in whom these co-occurred. However, only one participant with SMI had sought help from their GP, making it the least likely symptom to be reported. Subjective memory impairment is common and appears to have functional and/or emotional significance for many older people. However, very few appear to seek medical attention for this symptom, which has implications for wider policy regarding prompt assessment and diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment or dementia.
version5
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontrib
0Begum, Aysha
1Morgan, Craig
2Chiu, Chih‐Chiang
3Tylee, Andre
4Stewart, Robert
titleSubjective memory impairment in older adults: aetiology, salience and help seeking
subject
0Subjective Memory Impairment
1Memory Complaints
2Primary Care
3Memory Service
4Help Seeking
5Epidemiology
6Salience
general
0John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
110.1002/gps.2760
2Wiley Online Library
sourceidwj
recordidwj10.1002/gps.2760
issn
00885-6230
108856230
21099-1166
310991166
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2012
addtitle
0International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
1Int J Geriatr Psychiatry
searchscope
0wj
1wiley
scope
0wj
1wiley
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[description, pages, pqid]
sort
titleSubjective memory impairment in older adults: aetiology, salience and help seeking
authorBegum, Aysha ; Morgan, Craig ; Chiu, Chih‐Chiang ; Tylee, Andre ; Stewart, Robert
creationdate20120600
facets
frbrgroupid7224504908397764053
frbrtype5
creationdate2012
topic
0Subjective Memory Impairment
1Memory Complaints
2Primary Care
3Memory Service
4Help Seeking
5Epidemiology
6Salience
collectionWiley Online Library
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Begum, Aysha
1Morgan, Craig
2Chiu, Chih‐Chiang
3Tylee, Andre
4Stewart, Robert
jtitleInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Begum
1Morgan
2Chiu
3Tylee
4Stewart
aufirst
0Aysha
1Craig
2Chih‐Chiang
3Andre
4Robert
au
0Begum, Aysha
1Morgan, Craig
2Chiu, Chih‐Chiang
3Tylee, Andre
4Stewart, Robert
atitleSubjective memory impairment in older adults: aetiology, salience and help seeking
jtitleInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
risdate201206
volume27
issue6
spage612
epage620
issn0885-6230
eissn1099-1166
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
copChichester, UK
pubJohn Wiley & Sons, Ltd
doi10.1002/gps.2760
pages612-620
date2012-06