schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Super‐resolution track‐density imaging of thalamic substructures: Comparison with high‐resolution anatomical magnetic resonance imaging at 7.0T

The thalamus is one of the most important brain structures, with strong connections between subcortical and cortical areas of the brain. Most of the incoming information to the cortex passes through the thalamus. Accurate identification of substructures of the thalamus is therefore of great importan... Full description

Journal Title: Human Brain Mapping October 2013, Vol.34(10), pp.2538-2548
Main Author: Calamante, Fernando
Other Authors: Oh, Se‐Hong , Tournier, Jacques‐Donald , Park, Sung‐Yeon , Son, Young‐Don , Chung, Jun‐Young , Chi, Je‐Geun , Jackson, Graeme D. , Park, Chan‐Woong , Kim, Young‐Bo , Connelly, Alan , Cho, Zang‐Hee
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language:
Subjects:
Tdi
ID: ISSN: 1065-9471 ; E-ISSN: 1097-0193 ; DOI: 10.1002/hbm.22083
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: wj10.1002/hbm.22083
title: Super‐resolution track‐density imaging of thalamic substructures: Comparison with high‐resolution anatomical magnetic resonance imaging at 7.0T
format: Article
creator:
  • Calamante, Fernando
  • Oh, Se‐Hong
  • Tournier, Jacques‐Donald
  • Park, Sung‐Yeon
  • Son, Young‐Don
  • Chung, Jun‐Young
  • Chi, Je‐Geun
  • Jackson, Graeme D.
  • Park, Chan‐Woong
  • Kim, Young‐Bo
  • Connelly, Alan
  • Cho, Zang‐Hee
subjects:
  • Thalamus
  • Thalamus Substructures
  • Track‐Density Imaging
  • Tdi
  • 7.0t Mri
  • Diffusion Weighted Imaging
ispartof: Human Brain Mapping, October 2013, Vol.34(10), pp.2538-2548
description: The thalamus is one of the most important brain structures, with strong connections between subcortical and cortical areas of the brain. Most of the incoming information to the cortex passes through the thalamus. Accurate identification of substructures of the thalamus is therefore of great importance for the understanding of human brain connectivity. Direct visualization of thalamic substructures, however, is not easily achieved with currently available magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including ultra‐high field MRI such as 7.0T, mainly due to the limited contrast between the relevant structures. Recently, improvements in ultra‐high field 7.0T MRI have opened the possibility of observing thalamic substructures by well‐adjusted high‐resolution T‐weighted imaging. Moreover, the recently developed super‐resolution track‐density imaging (TDI) technique, based on results from whole‐brain fiber‐tracking, produces images with sub‐millimeter resolution. These two methods enable us to show markedly improved anatomical detail of the substructures of the thalamus, including their detailed locations and directionality. In this study, we demonstrate the role of TDI for the visualization of the substructures of the thalamic nuclei, and relate these images to T‐weighted imaging at 7.0T MRI. Hum Brain Mapp 34:2538–2548, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1065-9471 ; E-ISSN: 1097-0193 ; DOI: 10.1002/hbm.22083
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1065-9471
  • 10659471
  • 1097-0193
  • 10970193
url: Link


@attributes
ID1410691606
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid10.1002/hbm.22083
sourceidwj
recordidTN_wj10.1002/hbm.22083
sourcesystemPC
pqid1431642162
galeid350082737
display
typearticle
titleSuper‐resolution track‐density imaging of thalamic substructures: Comparison with high‐resolution anatomical magnetic resonance imaging at 7.0T
creatorCalamante, Fernando ; Oh, Se‐Hong ; Tournier, Jacques‐Donald ; Park, Sung‐Yeon ; Son, Young‐Don ; Chung, Jun‐Young ; Chi, Je‐Geun ; Jackson, Graeme D. ; Park, Chan‐Woong ; Kim, Young‐Bo ; Connelly, Alan ; Cho, Zang‐Hee
ispartofHuman Brain Mapping, October 2013, Vol.34(10), pp.2538-2548
identifier
subjectThalamus ; Thalamus Substructures ; Track‐Density Imaging ; Tdi ; 7.0t Mri ; Diffusion Weighted Imaging
descriptionThe thalamus is one of the most important brain structures, with strong connections between subcortical and cortical areas of the brain. Most of the incoming information to the cortex passes through the thalamus. Accurate identification of substructures of the thalamus is therefore of great importance for the understanding of human brain connectivity. Direct visualization of thalamic substructures, however, is not easily achieved with currently available magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including ultra‐high field MRI such as 7.0T, mainly due to the limited contrast between the relevant structures. Recently, improvements in ultra‐high field 7.0T MRI have opened the possibility of observing thalamic substructures by well‐adjusted high‐resolution T‐weighted imaging. Moreover, the recently developed super‐resolution track‐density imaging (TDI) technique, based on results from whole‐brain fiber‐tracking, produces images with sub‐millimeter resolution. These two methods enable us to show markedly improved anatomical detail of the substructures of the thalamus, including their detailed locations and directionality. In this study, we demonstrate the role of TDI for the visualization of the substructures of the thalamic nuclei, and relate these images to T‐weighted imaging at 7.0T MRI. Hum Brain Mapp 34:2538–2548, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
source
version7
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontrib
0Calamante, Fernando
1Oh, Se‐Hong
2Tournier, Jacques‐Donald
3Park, Sung‐Yeon
4Son, Young‐Don
5Chung, Jun‐Young
6Chi, Je‐Geun
7Jackson, Graeme D.
8Park, Chan‐Woong
9Kim, Young‐Bo
10Connelly, Alan
11Cho, Zang‐Hee
titleSuper‐resolution track‐density imaging of thalamic substructures: Comparison with high‐resolution anatomical magnetic resonance imaging at 7.0T
descriptionThe thalamus is one of the most important brain structures, with strong connections between subcortical and cortical areas of the brain. Most of the incoming information to the cortex passes through the thalamus. Accurate identification of substructures of the thalamus is therefore of great importance for the understanding of human brain connectivity. Direct visualization of thalamic substructures, however, is not easily achieved with currently available magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including ultra‐high field MRI such as 7.0T, mainly due to the limited contrast between the relevant structures. Recently, improvements in ultra‐high field 7.0T MRI have opened the possibility of observing thalamic substructures by well‐adjusted high‐resolution T‐weighted imaging. Moreover, the recently developed super‐resolution track‐density imaging (TDI) technique, based on results from whole‐brain fiber‐tracking, produces images with sub‐millimeter resolution. These two methods enable us to show markedly improved anatomical detail of the substructures of the thalamus, including their detailed locations and directionality. In this study, we demonstrate the role of TDI for the visualization of the substructures of the thalamic nuclei, and relate these images to T‐weighted imaging at 7.0T MRI. Hum Brain Mapp 34:2538–2548, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
subject
0Thalamus
1Thalamus Substructures
2Track‐Density Imaging
3Tdi
47.0t Mri
5Diffusion Weighted Imaging
general
010.1002/hbm.22083
1Wiley Online Library
sourceidwj
recordidwj10.1002/hbm.22083
issn
01065-9471
110659471
21097-0193
310970193
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2013
addtitle
0Human Brain Mapping
1Hum. Brain Mapp.
searchscope
0wj
1wiley
scope
0wj
1wiley
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pages, pqid, galeid]
sort
titleSuper‐resolution track‐density imaging of thalamic substructures: Comparison with high‐resolution anatomical magnetic resonance imaging at 7.0T
authorCalamante, Fernando ; Oh, Se‐Hong ; Tournier, Jacques‐Donald ; Park, Sung‐Yeon ; Son, Young‐Don ; Chung, Jun‐Young ; Chi, Je‐Geun ; Jackson, Graeme D. ; Park, Chan‐Woong ; Kim, Young‐Bo ; Connelly, Alan ; Cho, Zang‐Hee
creationdate20131000
facets
frbrgroupid7433131169719371992
frbrtype5
creationdate2013
topic
0Thalamus
1Thalamus Substructures
2Track‐Density Imaging
3Tdi
47.0t Mri
5Diffusion Weighted Imaging
collectionWiley Online Library
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Calamante, Fernando
1Oh, Se‐Hong
2Tournier, Jacques‐Donald
3Park, Sung‐Yeon
4Son, Young‐Don
5Chung, Jun‐Young
6Chi, Je‐Geun
7Jackson, Graeme D.
8Park, Chan‐Woong
9Kim, Young‐Bo
10Connelly, Alan
11Cho, Zang‐Hee
jtitleHuman Brain Mapping
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Calamante
1Oh
2Tournier
3Park
4Son
5Chung
6Chi
7Jackson
8Kim
9Connelly
10Cho
aufirst
0Fernando
1Se‐Hong
2Jacques‐Donald
3Sung‐Yeon
4Young‐Don
5Jun‐Young
6Je‐Geun
7Graeme D.
8Chan‐Woong
9Young‐Bo
10Alan
11Zang‐Hee
au
0Calamante, Fernando
1Oh, Se‐Hong
2Tournier, Jacques‐Donald
3Park, Sung‐Yeon
4Son, Young‐Don
5Chung, Jun‐Young
6Chi, Je‐Geun
7Jackson, Graeme D.
8Park, Chan‐Woong
9Kim, Young‐Bo
10Connelly, Alan
11Cho, Zang‐Hee
atitleSuper‐resolution track‐density imaging of thalamic substructures: Comparison with high‐resolution anatomical magnetic resonance imaging at 7.0T
jtitleHuman Brain Mapping
risdate201310
volume34
issue10
spage2538
epage2548
issn1065-9471
eissn1097-0193
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractThe thalamus is one of the most important brain structures, with strong connections between subcortical and cortical areas of the brain. Most of the incoming information to the cortex passes through the thalamus. Accurate identification of substructures of the thalamus is therefore of great importance for the understanding of human brain connectivity. Direct visualization of thalamic substructures, however, is not easily achieved with currently available magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including ultra‐high field MRI such as 7.0T, mainly due to the limited contrast between the relevant structures. Recently, improvements in ultra‐high field 7.0T MRI have opened the possibility of observing thalamic substructures by well‐adjusted high‐resolution T‐weighted imaging. Moreover, the recently developed super‐resolution track‐density imaging (TDI) technique, based on results from whole‐brain fiber‐tracking, produces images with sub‐millimeter resolution. These two methods enable us to show markedly improved anatomical detail of the substructures of the thalamus, including their detailed locations and directionality. In this study, we demonstrate the role of TDI for the visualization of the substructures of the thalamic nuclei, and relate these images to T‐weighted imaging at 7.0T MRI. Hum Brain Mapp 34:2538–2548, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
doi10.1002/hbm.22083
pages2538-2548
date2013-10