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Hepatocytes and neutrophils cooperatively suppress bacterial infection by differentially regulating lipocalin‐2 and neutrophil extracellular traps

Lipocalin‐2 (LCN2), also known as neutrophil gelatinase‐associated lipocalin (NGAL), a key antibacterial protein, is highly elevated in patients with end‐stage liver disease that is often associated with bacterial infection. LCN2 is expressed at high levels in both hepatocytes and neutrophils; howev... Full description

Journal Title: Hepatology October 2018, Vol.68(4), pp.1604-1620
Main Author: Li, Hongjie
Other Authors: Feng, Dechun , Cai, Yan , Liu, Yudong , Xu, Mingjiang , Xiang, Xiaogang , Zhou, Zhou , Xia, Qiang , Kaplan, Mariana J. , Kong, Xiaoni , Gao, Bin
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ID: ISSN: 0270-9139 ; E-ISSN: 1527-3350 ; DOI: 10.1002/hep.29919
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recordid: wj10.1002/hep.29919
title: Hepatocytes and neutrophils cooperatively suppress bacterial infection by differentially regulating lipocalin‐2 and neutrophil extracellular traps
format: Article
creator:
  • Li, Hongjie
  • Feng, Dechun
  • Cai, Yan
  • Liu, Yudong
  • Xu, Mingjiang
  • Xiang, Xiaogang
  • Zhou, Zhou
  • Xia, Qiang
  • Kaplan, Mariana J.
  • Kong, Xiaoni
  • Gao, Bin
subjects:
  • Acute-Phase Proteins–Metabolism
  • Analysis of Variance–Metabolism
  • Animals–Metabolism
  • Disease Models, Animal–Metabolism
  • Extracellular Traps–Pathology
  • Hepatocytes–Pathogenicity
  • Humans–Genetics
  • Klebsiella Infections–Metabolism
  • Klebsiella Pneumoniae–Metabolism
  • Lipocalin-2–Metabolism
  • Mice–Metabolism
  • Mice, Inbred C57bl–Metabolism
  • Mice, Knockout–Metabolism
  • Neutrophils–Metabolism
  • Random Allocation–Metabolism
  • Acute-Phase Proteins
  • Lipocalin-2
  • Lcn2 Protein, Mouse
ispartof: Hepatology, October 2018, Vol.68(4), pp.1604-1620
description: Lipocalin‐2 (LCN2), also known as neutrophil gelatinase‐associated lipocalin (NGAL), a key antibacterial protein, is highly elevated in patients with end‐stage liver disease that is often associated with bacterial infection. LCN2 is expressed at high levels in both hepatocytes and neutrophils; however, how hepatocyte‐derived and neutrophil‐derived LCN2 cooperate to combat bacterial infection remains unclear. Here, by studying hepatocyte‐specific and myeloid‐specific knockout mice in two models of systemic and local infections, we demonstrated that hepatocytes played a critical role in controlling systemic infection by secreting LCN2 protein into the circulation following intraperitoneal injection of bacteria, whereas neutrophils were more important in combating local lung infection by carrying LCN2 in their specific granules to the local infection site following intratracheal intubation of bacteria. Both hepatocyte‐derived and myeloid cell–derived LCN2 were required against bacterial infection in the peritoneal cavity and liver necrotic areas following intraperitoneal injection of . LCN2/NGAL protein was detected in neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in activated neutrophils from mice and humans. Disruption of the gene in neutrophils abolished LCN2 on NETs, whereas deletion of this gene in hepatocytes did not affect LCN2 protein on NETs. Genetic deletion of the gene globally or specifically in neutrophils did not affect NET formation but reduced the bactericidal effect of NETs . Finally, NGAL‐positive NETs were detected in the liver from patients with various types of liver diseases. : Both hepatocytes and neutrophils combat bacterial infection through the production of LCN2; extracellular LCN2 secreted by hepatocytes limits systemic bacterial infection, whereas neutrophils carry LCN2 protein to the local site and against local bacterial infection through NETs. (H 2018).
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0270-9139 ; E-ISSN: 1527-3350 ; DOI: 10.1002/hep.29919
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0270-9139
  • 02709139
  • 1527-3350
  • 15273350
url: Link


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titleHepatocytes and neutrophils cooperatively suppress bacterial infection by differentially regulating lipocalin‐2 and neutrophil extracellular traps
creatorLi, Hongjie ; Feng, Dechun ; Cai, Yan ; Liu, Yudong ; Xu, Mingjiang ; Xiang, Xiaogang ; Zhou, Zhou ; Xia, Qiang ; Kaplan, Mariana J. ; Kong, Xiaoni ; Gao, Bin
ispartofHepatology, October 2018, Vol.68(4), pp.1604-1620
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descriptionLipocalin‐2 (LCN2), also known as neutrophil gelatinase‐associated lipocalin (NGAL), a key antibacterial protein, is highly elevated in patients with end‐stage liver disease that is often associated with bacterial infection. LCN2 is expressed at high levels in both hepatocytes and neutrophils; however, how hepatocyte‐derived and neutrophil‐derived LCN2 cooperate to combat bacterial infection remains unclear. Here, by studying hepatocyte‐specific and myeloid‐specific knockout mice in two models of systemic and local infections, we demonstrated that hepatocytes played a critical role in controlling systemic infection by secreting LCN2 protein into the circulation following intraperitoneal injection of bacteria, whereas neutrophils were more important in combating local lung infection by carrying LCN2 in their specific granules to the local infection site following intratracheal intubation of bacteria. Both hepatocyte‐derived and myeloid cell–derived LCN2 were required against bacterial infection in the peritoneal cavity and liver necrotic areas following intraperitoneal injection of . LCN2/NGAL protein was detected in neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in activated neutrophils from mice and humans. Disruption of the gene in neutrophils abolished LCN2 on NETs, whereas deletion of this gene in hepatocytes did not affect LCN2 protein on NETs. Genetic deletion of the gene globally or specifically in neutrophils did not affect NET formation but reduced the bactericidal effect of NETs . Finally, NGAL‐positive NETs were detected in the liver from patients with various types of liver diseases. : Both hepatocytes and neutrophils combat bacterial infection through the production of LCN2; extracellular LCN2 secreted by hepatocytes limits systemic bacterial infection, whereas neutrophils carry LCN2 protein to the local site and against local bacterial infection through NETs. (H 2018).
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subjectAcute-Phase Proteins–Metabolism ; Analysis of Variance–Metabolism ; Animals–Metabolism ; Disease Models, Animal–Metabolism ; Extracellular Traps–Pathology ; Hepatocytes–Pathogenicity ; Humans–Genetics ; Klebsiella Infections–Metabolism ; Klebsiella Pneumoniae–Metabolism ; Lipocalin-2–Metabolism ; Mice–Metabolism ; Mice, Inbred C57bl–Metabolism ; Mice, Knockout–Metabolism ; Neutrophils–Metabolism ; Random Allocation–Metabolism ; Acute-Phase Proteins ; Lipocalin-2 ; Lcn2 Protein, Mouse;
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titleHepatocytes and neutrophils cooperatively suppress bacterial infection by differentially regulating lipocalin‐2 and neutrophil extracellular traps
descriptionLipocalin‐2 (LCN2), also known as neutrophil gelatinase‐associated lipocalin (NGAL), a key antibacterial protein, is highly elevated in patients with end‐stage liver disease that is often associated with bacterial infection. LCN2 is expressed at high levels in both hepatocytes and neutrophils; however, how hepatocyte‐derived and neutrophil‐derived LCN2 cooperate to combat bacterial infection remains unclear. Here, by studying hepatocyte‐specific and myeloid‐specific knockout mice in two models of systemic and local infections, we demonstrated that hepatocytes played a critical role in controlling systemic infection by secreting LCN2 protein into the circulation following intraperitoneal injection of bacteria, whereas neutrophils were more important in combating local lung infection by carrying LCN2 in their specific granules to the local infection site following intratracheal intubation of bacteria. Both hepatocyte‐derived and myeloid cell–derived LCN2 were required against bacterial infection in the peritoneal cavity and liver necrotic areas following intraperitoneal injection of . LCN2/NGAL protein was detected in neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in activated neutrophils from mice and humans. Disruption of the gene in neutrophils abolished LCN2 on NETs, whereas deletion of this gene in hepatocytes did not affect LCN2 protein on NETs. Genetic deletion of the gene globally or specifically in neutrophils did not affect NET formation but reduced the bactericidal effect of NETs . Finally, NGAL‐positive NETs were detected in the liver from patients with various types of liver diseases. : Both hepatocytes and neutrophils combat bacterial infection through the production of LCN2; extracellular LCN2 secreted by hepatocytes limits systemic bacterial infection, whereas neutrophils carry LCN2 protein to the local site and against local bacterial infection through NETs. (H 2018).
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abstractLipocalin‐2 (LCN2), also known as neutrophil gelatinase‐associated lipocalin (NGAL), a key antibacterial protein, is highly elevated in patients with end‐stage liver disease that is often associated with bacterial infection. LCN2 is expressed at high levels in both hepatocytes and neutrophils; however, how hepatocyte‐derived and neutrophil‐derived LCN2 cooperate to combat bacterial infection remains unclear. Here, by studying hepatocyte‐specific and myeloid‐specific knockout mice in two models of systemic and local infections, we demonstrated that hepatocytes played a critical role in controlling systemic infection by secreting LCN2 protein into the circulation following intraperitoneal injection of bacteria, whereas neutrophils were more important in combating local lung infection by carrying LCN2 in their specific granules to the local infection site following intratracheal intubation of bacteria. Both hepatocyte‐derived and myeloid cell–derived LCN2 were required against bacterial infection in the peritoneal cavity and liver necrotic areas following intraperitoneal injection of . LCN2/NGAL protein was detected in neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in activated neutrophils from mice and humans. Disruption of the gene in neutrophils abolished LCN2 on NETs, whereas deletion of this gene in hepatocytes did not affect LCN2 protein on NETs. Genetic deletion of the gene globally or specifically in neutrophils did not affect NET formation but reduced the bactericidal effect of NETs . Finally, NGAL‐positive NETs were detected in the liver from patients with various types of liver diseases. : Both hepatocytes and neutrophils combat bacterial infection through the production of LCN2; extracellular LCN2 secreted by hepatocytes limits systemic bacterial infection, whereas neutrophils carry LCN2 protein to the local site and against local bacterial infection through NETs. (H 2018).
doi10.1002/hep.29919
pages1604-1620
date2018-10