schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, recreational physical activity and breast cancer risk

The mechanisms driving the inverse association between recreational physical activity (RPA) and breast cancer risk are complex. While exercise is associated with increased reactive oxygen species production it may also improve damage repair systems, particularly those that operate on single‐strand b... Full description

Journal Title: International Journal of Cancer 01 February 2014, Vol.134(3), pp.654-663
Main Author: Mccullough, Lauren E.
Other Authors: Santella, Regina M. , Cleveland, Rebecca J. , Millikan, Robert C. , Olshan, Andrew F. , North, Kari E. , Bradshaw, Patrick T. , Eng, Sybil M. , Terry, Mary Beth , Shen, Jing , Crew, Katherine D. , Rossner, Pavel , Teitelbaum, Susan L. , Neugut, Alfred I. , Gammon, Marilie D.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language:
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0020-7136 ; E-ISSN: 1097-0215 ; DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28383
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: wj10.1002/ijc.28383
title: Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, recreational physical activity and breast cancer risk
format: Article
creator:
  • Mccullough, Lauren E.
  • Santella, Regina M.
  • Cleveland, Rebecca J.
  • Millikan, Robert C.
  • Olshan, Andrew F.
  • North, Kari E.
  • Bradshaw, Patrick T.
  • Eng, Sybil M.
  • Terry, Mary Beth
  • Shen, Jing
  • Crew, Katherine D.
  • Rossner, Pavel
  • Teitelbaum, Susan L.
  • Neugut, Alfred I.
  • Gammon, Marilie D.
subjects:
  • Breast Cancer
  • Epidemiology
  • Dna Repair
  • Mismatch Repair
  • Physical Activity
ispartof: International Journal of Cancer, 01 February 2014, Vol.134(3), pp.654-663
description: The mechanisms driving the inverse association between recreational physical activity (RPA) and breast cancer risk are complex. While exercise is associated with increased reactive oxygen species production it may also improve damage repair systems, particularly those that operate on single‐strand breaks including base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER) and mismatch repair (MMR). Of these repair pathways, the role of MMR in breast carcinogenesis is least investigated. Polymorphisms in MMR or other DNA repair gene variants may modify the association between RPA and breast cancer incidence. We investigated the individual and joint effects of variants in three MMR pathway genes ( and ) on breast cancer occurrence using resources from the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project. We additionally characterized interactions between RPA and genetic polymorphisms in MMR, BER and NER pathways. We found statistically significant multiplicative interactions ( < 0.05) between and as well as between postmenopausal RPA and four variants in DNA repair (‐Ala499Val, ‐Arg415Gln, ‐Asp1104His and ‐lle219Val). Significant risk reductions were observed among highly active women with the common genotype for (OR = 0.54; 95% CI, 0.36–0.81) and (OR = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.44–0.87), as well as among active women who carried at least one variant allele in (OR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.29–0.77) and (OR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.30–0.71). Our data show that women with minor alleles in both and could be at increased breast cancer risk. RPA may be modified by genes in the DNA repair pathway, and merit further investigation. What's new? Physical activity increases the production of reactive oxygen species but also offsets oxidative damage by enhancing DNA repair, a phenomenon that could help explain the inverse relationship between exercise and breast cancer. Mismatch repair (MMR), the least studied of the repair systems in breast cancer, was the focus of this investigation, which reveals an absence of association between disease risk and six MMR polymorphisms but a significant risk in risk for gene‐gene interactions between variants in and . The data suggest that allelic variability in DNA repair may modify associations between physical activity and breast cancer.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0020-7136 ; E-ISSN: 1097-0215 ; DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28383
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0020-7136
  • 00207136
  • 1097-0215
  • 10970215
url: Link


@attributes
ID958474314
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid10.1002/ijc.28383
sourceidwj
recordidTN_wj10.1002/ijc.28383
sourcesystemPC
pqid1457482523
galeid349740833
display
typearticle
titlePolymorphisms in DNA repair genes, recreational physical activity and breast cancer risk
creatorMccullough, Lauren E. ; Santella, Regina M. ; Cleveland, Rebecca J. ; Millikan, Robert C. ; Olshan, Andrew F. ; North, Kari E. ; Bradshaw, Patrick T. ; Eng, Sybil M. ; Terry, Mary Beth ; Shen, Jing ; Crew, Katherine D. ; Rossner, Pavel ; Teitelbaum, Susan L. ; Neugut, Alfred I. ; Gammon, Marilie D.
ispartofInternational Journal of Cancer, 01 February 2014, Vol.134(3), pp.654-663
identifier
subjectBreast Cancer ; Epidemiology ; Dna Repair ; Mismatch Repair ; Physical Activity
descriptionThe mechanisms driving the inverse association between recreational physical activity (RPA) and breast cancer risk are complex. While exercise is associated with increased reactive oxygen species production it may also improve damage repair systems, particularly those that operate on single‐strand breaks including base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER) and mismatch repair (MMR). Of these repair pathways, the role of MMR in breast carcinogenesis is least investigated. Polymorphisms in MMR or other DNA repair gene variants may modify the association between RPA and breast cancer incidence. We investigated the individual and joint effects of variants in three MMR pathway genes ( and ) on breast cancer occurrence using resources from the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project. We additionally characterized interactions between RPA and genetic polymorphisms in MMR, BER and NER pathways. We found statistically significant multiplicative interactions ( < 0.05) between and as well as between postmenopausal RPA and four variants in DNA repair (‐Ala499Val, ‐Arg415Gln, ‐Asp1104His and ‐lle219Val). Significant risk reductions were observed among highly active women with the common genotype for (OR = 0.54; 95% CI, 0.36–0.81) and (OR = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.44–0.87), as well as among active women who carried at least one variant allele in (OR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.29–0.77) and (OR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.30–0.71). Our data show that women with minor alleles in both and could be at increased breast cancer risk. RPA may be modified by genes in the DNA repair pathway, and merit further investigation. What's new? Physical activity increases the production of reactive oxygen species but also offsets oxidative damage by enhancing DNA repair, a phenomenon that could help explain the inverse relationship between exercise and breast cancer. Mismatch repair (MMR), the least studied of the repair systems in breast cancer, was the focus of this investigation, which reveals an absence of association between disease risk and six MMR polymorphisms but a significant risk in risk for gene‐gene interactions between variants in and . The data suggest that allelic variability in DNA repair may modify associations between physical activity and breast cancer.
source
version7
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontrib
0Mccullough, Lauren E.
1Santella, Regina M.
2Cleveland, Rebecca J.
3Millikan, Robert C.
4Olshan, Andrew F.
5North, Kari E.
6Bradshaw, Patrick T.
7Eng, Sybil M.
8Terry, Mary Beth
9Shen, Jing
10Crew, Katherine D.
11Rossner, Pavel
12Teitelbaum, Susan L.
13Neugut, Alfred I.
14Gammon, Marilie D.
titlePolymorphisms in DNA repair genes, recreational physical activity and breast cancer risk
descriptionThe mechanisms driving the inverse association between recreational physical activity (RPA) and breast cancer risk are complex. While exercise is associated with increased reactive oxygen species production it may also improve damage repair systems, particularly those that operate on single‐strand breaks including base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER) and mismatch repair (MMR). Of these repair pathways, the role of MMR in breast carcinogenesis is least investigated. Polymorphisms in MMR or other DNA repair gene variants may modify the association between RPA and breast cancer incidence. We investigated the individual and joint effects of variants in three MMR pathway genes ( and ) on breast cancer occurrence using resources from the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project. We additionally characterized interactions between RPA and genetic polymorphisms in MMR, BER and NER pathways. We found statistically significant multiplicative interactions ( < 0.05) between and as well as between postmenopausal RPA and four variants in DNA repair (‐Ala499Val, ‐Arg415Gln, ‐Asp1104His and ‐lle219Val). Significant risk reductions were observed among highly active women with the common genotype for (OR = 0.54; 95% CI, 0.36–0.81) and (OR = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.44–0.87), as well as among active women who carried at least one variant allele in (OR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.29–0.77) and (OR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.30–0.71). Our data show that women with minor alleles in both and could be at increased breast cancer risk. RPA may be modified by genes in the DNA repair pathway, and merit further investigation. What's new? Physical activity increases the production of reactive oxygen species but also offsets oxidative damage by enhancing DNA repair, a phenomenon that could help explain the inverse relationship between exercise and breast cancer. Mismatch repair (MMR), the least studied of the repair systems in breast cancer, was the focus of this investigation, which reveals an absence of association between disease risk and six MMR polymorphisms but a significant risk in risk for gene‐gene interactions between variants in and . The data suggest that allelic variability in DNA repair may modify associations between physical activity and breast cancer.
subject
0Breast Cancer
1Epidemiology
2Dna Repair
3Mismatch Repair
4Physical Activity
general
010.1002/ijc.28383
1Wiley Online Library
sourceidwj
recordidwj10.1002/ijc.28383
issn
00020-7136
100207136
21097-0215
310970215
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2014
addtitle
0International Journal of Cancer
1Int. J. Cancer
searchscope
0wj
1wiley
scope
0wj
1wiley
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pqid, galeid, pages]
sort
titlePolymorphisms in DNA repair genes, recreational physical activity and breast cancer risk
authorMccullough, Lauren E. ; Santella, Regina M. ; Cleveland, Rebecca J. ; Millikan, Robert C. ; Olshan, Andrew F. ; North, Kari E. ; Bradshaw, Patrick T. ; Eng, Sybil M. ; Terry, Mary Beth ; Shen, Jing ; Crew, Katherine D. ; Rossner, Pavel ; Teitelbaum, Susan L. ; Neugut, Alfred I. ; Gammon, Marilie D.
creationdate20140201
facets
frbrgroupid8778123519705428593
frbrtype5
creationdate2014
topic
0Breast Cancer
1Epidemiology
2Dna Repair
3Mismatch Repair
4Physical Activity
collectionWiley Online Library
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Mccullough, Lauren E.
1Santella, Regina M.
2Cleveland, Rebecca J.
3Millikan, Robert C.
4Olshan, Andrew F.
5North, Kari E.
6Bradshaw, Patrick T.
7Eng, Sybil M.
8Terry, Mary Beth
9Shen, Jing
10Crew, Katherine D.
11Rossner, Pavel
12Teitelbaum, Susan L.
13Neugut, Alfred I.
14Gammon, Marilie D.
jtitleInternational Journal of Cancer
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0McCullough
1Santella
2Cleveland
3Millikan
4Olshan
5North
6Bradshaw
7Eng
8Terry
9Shen
10Crew
11Rossner
12Teitelbaum
13Neugut
14Gammon
aufirst
0Lauren E.
1Regina M.
2Rebecca J.
3Robert C.
4Andrew F.
5Kari E.
6Patrick T.
7Sybil M.
8Mary Beth
9Jing
10Katherine D.
11Pavel
12Susan L.
13Alfred I.
14Marilie D.
au
0Mccullough, Lauren E.
1Santella, Regina M.
2Cleveland, Rebecca J.
3Millikan, Robert C.
4Olshan, Andrew F.
5North, Kari E.
6Bradshaw, Patrick T.
7Eng, Sybil M.
8Terry, Mary Beth
9Shen, Jing
10Crew, Katherine D.
11Rossner, Pavel
12Teitelbaum, Susan L.
13Neugut, Alfred I.
14Gammon, Marilie D.
atitlePolymorphisms in DNA repair genes, recreational physical activity and breast cancer risk
jtitleInternational Journal of Cancer
risdate20140201
volume134
issue3
spage654
epage663
issn0020-7136
eissn1097-0215
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractThe mechanisms driving the inverse association between recreational physical activity (RPA) and breast cancer risk are complex. While exercise is associated with increased reactive oxygen species production it may also improve damage repair systems, particularly those that operate on single‐strand breaks including base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER) and mismatch repair (MMR). Of these repair pathways, the role of MMR in breast carcinogenesis is least investigated. Polymorphisms in MMR or other DNA repair gene variants may modify the association between RPA and breast cancer incidence. We investigated the individual and joint effects of variants in three MMR pathway genes ( and ) on breast cancer occurrence using resources from the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project. We additionally characterized interactions between RPA and genetic polymorphisms in MMR, BER and NER pathways. We found statistically significant multiplicative interactions ( < 0.05) between and as well as between postmenopausal RPA and four variants in DNA repair (‐Ala499Val, ‐Arg415Gln, ‐Asp1104His and ‐lle219Val). Significant risk reductions were observed among highly active women with the common genotype for (OR = 0.54; 95% CI, 0.36–0.81) and (OR = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.44–0.87), as well as among active women who carried at least one variant allele in (OR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.29–0.77) and (OR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.30–0.71). Our data show that women with minor alleles in both and could be at increased breast cancer risk. RPA may be modified by genes in the DNA repair pathway, and merit further investigation. What's new? Physical activity increases the production of reactive oxygen species but also offsets oxidative damage by enhancing DNA repair, a phenomenon that could help explain the inverse relationship between exercise and breast cancer. Mismatch repair (MMR), the least studied of the repair systems in breast cancer, was the focus of this investigation, which reveals an absence of association between disease risk and six MMR polymorphisms but a significant risk in risk for gene‐gene interactions between variants in and . The data suggest that allelic variability in DNA repair may modify associations between physical activity and breast cancer.
doi10.1002/ijc.28383
pages654-663
date2014-02-01