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Mesenchymal stem cell and gelatin microparticle encapsulation in thermally and chemically gelling injectable hydrogels for tissue engineering

In this work, we investigated the viability and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated with gelatin microparticles (GMPs) in an injectable, chemically and thermally gelling hydrogel system combining poly(‐isopropylacrylamide)‐based thermogelling macromers containing pendan... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A May 2014, Vol.102(5), pp.1222-1230
Main Author: Tzouanas, Stephanie N.
Other Authors: Ekenseair, Adam K. , Kasper, F. Kurtis , Mikos, Antonios G.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 1549-3296 ; E-ISSN: 1552-4965 ; DOI: 10.1002/jbm.a.35093
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recordid: wj10.1002/jbm.a.35093
title: Mesenchymal stem cell and gelatin microparticle encapsulation in thermally and chemically gelling injectable hydrogels for tissue engineering
format: Article
creator:
  • Tzouanas, Stephanie N.
  • Ekenseair, Adam K.
  • Kasper, F. Kurtis
  • Mikos, Antonios G.
subjects:
  • Cell Encapsulation
  • Gelatin Microparticles
  • Mineralization
  • Osteogenic Differentiation
  • Thermogelling Hydrogels
ispartof: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, May 2014, Vol.102(5), pp.1222-1230
description: In this work, we investigated the viability and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated with gelatin microparticles (GMPs) in an injectable, chemically and thermally gelling hydrogel system combining poly(‐isopropylacrylamide)‐based thermogelling macromers containing pendant epoxy rings with polyamidoamine‐based hydrophilic and degradable diamine crosslinking macromers. Specifically, we studied how the parameters of GMP size and loading ratio affected the viability and differentiation of cells encapsulated within the hydrogel. We also examined the effects of cell and GMP co‐encapsulation on hydrogel mineralization. Cells demonstrated long‐term viability within the hydrogels, which was shown to depend on GMP size and loading ratio. In particular, increased interaction of cells and GMPs through greater available GMP surface area, use of an epoxy‐based chemical gelation mechanism, and the tunable high water content of the thermogelled hydrogels led to favorable long‐term cell viability. Compared with cellular hydrogels without GMPs, hydrogels co‐encapsulating cells and GMPs demonstrated greater production of alkaline phosphatase by cells at all time‐points and a transient early enhancement of hydrogel mineralization for larger GMPs at higher loading ratios. Such injectable, forming hydrogels capable of delivering and maintaining populations of encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells and promoting mineralization offer promise as novel therapies for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 102A: 1222–1230, 2014.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1549-3296 ; E-ISSN: 1552-4965 ; DOI: 10.1002/jbm.a.35093
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1549-3296
  • 15493296
  • 1552-4965
  • 15524965
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titleMesenchymal stem cell and gelatin microparticle encapsulation in thermally and chemically gelling injectable hydrogels for tissue engineering
creatorTzouanas, Stephanie N. ; Ekenseair, Adam K. ; Kasper, F. Kurtis ; Mikos, Antonios G.
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subjectCell Encapsulation ; Gelatin Microparticles ; Mineralization ; Osteogenic Differentiation ; Thermogelling Hydrogels
descriptionIn this work, we investigated the viability and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated with gelatin microparticles (GMPs) in an injectable, chemically and thermally gelling hydrogel system combining poly(‐isopropylacrylamide)‐based thermogelling macromers containing pendant epoxy rings with polyamidoamine‐based hydrophilic and degradable diamine crosslinking macromers. Specifically, we studied how the parameters of GMP size and loading ratio affected the viability and differentiation of cells encapsulated within the hydrogel. We also examined the effects of cell and GMP co‐encapsulation on hydrogel mineralization. Cells demonstrated long‐term viability within the hydrogels, which was shown to depend on GMP size and loading ratio. In particular, increased interaction of cells and GMPs through greater available GMP surface area, use of an epoxy‐based chemical gelation mechanism, and the tunable high water content of the thermogelled hydrogels led to favorable long‐term cell viability. Compared with cellular hydrogels without GMPs, hydrogels co‐encapsulating cells and GMPs demonstrated greater production of alkaline phosphatase by cells at all time‐points and a transient early enhancement of hydrogel mineralization for larger GMPs at higher loading ratios. Such injectable, forming hydrogels capable of delivering and maintaining populations of encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells and promoting mineralization offer promise as novel therapies for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 102A: 1222–1230, 2014.
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abstractIn this work, we investigated the viability and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated with gelatin microparticles (GMPs) in an injectable, chemically and thermally gelling hydrogel system combining poly(‐isopropylacrylamide)‐based thermogelling macromers containing pendant epoxy rings with polyamidoamine‐based hydrophilic and degradable diamine crosslinking macromers. Specifically, we studied how the parameters of GMP size and loading ratio affected the viability and differentiation of cells encapsulated within the hydrogel. We also examined the effects of cell and GMP co‐encapsulation on hydrogel mineralization. Cells demonstrated long‐term viability within the hydrogels, which was shown to depend on GMP size and loading ratio. In particular, increased interaction of cells and GMPs through greater available GMP surface area, use of an epoxy‐based chemical gelation mechanism, and the tunable high water content of the thermogelled hydrogels led to favorable long‐term cell viability. Compared with cellular hydrogels without GMPs, hydrogels co‐encapsulating cells and GMPs demonstrated greater production of alkaline phosphatase by cells at all time‐points and a transient early enhancement of hydrogel mineralization for larger GMPs at higher loading ratios. Such injectable, forming hydrogels capable of delivering and maintaining populations of encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells and promoting mineralization offer promise as novel therapies for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 102A: 1222–1230, 2014.
doi10.1002/jbm.a.35093
pages1222-1230
date2014-05