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Alternating or continuous exposure to cafeteria diet leads to similar shifts in gut microbiota compared to chow diet

Scope Overconsumption of energy‐rich food is a major contributor to the obesity epidemic. The eating habits of many people are characterized by the cycling between overconsumption of energy‐rich foods and dieting, the effects of which on the microbiota are currently unknown. Methods and results We c... Full description

Journal Title: Molecular nutrition & food research 2017-01, Vol.61 (1), p.1500815-n/a
Main Author: Kaakoush, Nadeem O
Other Authors: Martire, Sarah I , Raipuria, Mukesh , Mitchell, Hazel M , Nielsen, Shaun , Westbrook, R. Fred , Morris, Margaret J
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Germany: Wiley Subscription Services, Inc
ID: ISSN: 1613-4125
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26767716
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1855066670
title: Alternating or continuous exposure to cafeteria diet leads to similar shifts in gut microbiota compared to chow diet
format: Article
creator:
  • Kaakoush, Nadeem O
  • Martire, Sarah I
  • Raipuria, Mukesh
  • Mitchell, Hazel M
  • Nielsen, Shaun
  • Westbrook, R. Fred
  • Morris, Margaret J
subjects:
  • Adipose Tissue
  • Animals
  • Binge eating
  • Comparative analysis
  • Compulsive eating
  • Diet
  • Diet, Western
  • Eating
  • Feeding Behavior
  • Food habits
  • Gastrointestinal Microbiome - genetics
  • Insulin - blood
  • Leptin - blood
  • Male
  • Metabolic disease
  • Metagenomics - methods
  • Microbiota
  • Microbiota (Symbiotic organisms)
  • Obesity
  • Obesity - etiology
  • Obesity - microbiology
  • Rats, Sprague-Dawley
  • Western cafeteria diet
ispartof: Molecular nutrition & food research, 2017-01, Vol.61 (1), p.1500815-n/a
description: Scope Overconsumption of energy‐rich food is a major contributor to the obesity epidemic. The eating habits of many people are characterized by the cycling between overconsumption of energy‐rich foods and dieting, the effects of which on the microbiota are currently unknown. Methods and results We compared the fecal microbiota of rats either continuously fed chow or palatable cafeteria diet to a “cycled” group switched between the two diets (chow for 4, cafeteria for 3 days/wk, n = 12/group) over 16 wk. Enriched bacterial metabolic pathways were predicted, and a range of metabolic parameters was correlated to microbial taxa and pathways. Cycled rats showed large excursions in food intake on each diet switch. When switched from chow to cafeteria, they overconsumed, and when switched back to chow they underconsumed relative to those maintained on the two diets. Metabolic parameters of cycled rats were intermediate between those of the other diet groups (p < 0.05). The microbiota of cycled rats was nearly indistinguishable from rats under constant cafeteria diet, and both groups were significantly different to the chow group. Correlation analyses identified microbial metabolic pathways associated with an obese phenotype. Conclusion These data suggest that continuous or intermittent exposure to palatable foods have similar effects on the gut microbiota. The gut bacteria of rats either continuously fed standard chow or palatable cafeteria diet are compared to a third group cycled between these diets (4/3 days each wk) over 16 wks. Body weight and metabolic parameters of cycled rats were intermediate between those of the other diet groups. Gut bacteria of cycled rats were nearly indistinguishable from rats under constant cafeteria diet, and both groups were different to the chow group. Thus, any exposure to junk food affects gut bacteria.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1613-4125
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 1613-4125
  • 1613-4133
url: Link


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titleAlternating or continuous exposure to cafeteria diet leads to similar shifts in gut microbiota compared to chow diet
creatorKaakoush, Nadeem O ; Martire, Sarah I ; Raipuria, Mukesh ; Mitchell, Hazel M ; Nielsen, Shaun ; Westbrook, R. Fred ; Morris, Margaret J
creatorcontribKaakoush, Nadeem O ; Martire, Sarah I ; Raipuria, Mukesh ; Mitchell, Hazel M ; Nielsen, Shaun ; Westbrook, R. Fred ; Morris, Margaret J
descriptionScope Overconsumption of energy‐rich food is a major contributor to the obesity epidemic. The eating habits of many people are characterized by the cycling between overconsumption of energy‐rich foods and dieting, the effects of which on the microbiota are currently unknown. Methods and results We compared the fecal microbiota of rats either continuously fed chow or palatable cafeteria diet to a “cycled” group switched between the two diets (chow for 4, cafeteria for 3 days/wk, n = 12/group) over 16 wk. Enriched bacterial metabolic pathways were predicted, and a range of metabolic parameters was correlated to microbial taxa and pathways. Cycled rats showed large excursions in food intake on each diet switch. When switched from chow to cafeteria, they overconsumed, and when switched back to chow they underconsumed relative to those maintained on the two diets. Metabolic parameters of cycled rats were intermediate between those of the other diet groups (p < 0.05). The microbiota of cycled rats was nearly indistinguishable from rats under constant cafeteria diet, and both groups were significantly different to the chow group. Correlation analyses identified microbial metabolic pathways associated with an obese phenotype. Conclusion These data suggest that continuous or intermittent exposure to palatable foods have similar effects on the gut microbiota. The gut bacteria of rats either continuously fed standard chow or palatable cafeteria diet are compared to a third group cycled between these diets (4/3 days each wk) over 16 wks. Body weight and metabolic parameters of cycled rats were intermediate between those of the other diet groups. Gut bacteria of cycled rats were nearly indistinguishable from rats under constant cafeteria diet, and both groups were different to the chow group. Thus, any exposure to junk food affects gut bacteria.
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subjectAdipose Tissue ; Animals ; Binge eating ; Comparative analysis ; Compulsive eating ; Diet ; Diet, Western ; Eating ; Feeding Behavior ; Food habits ; Gastrointestinal Microbiome - genetics ; Insulin - blood ; Leptin - blood ; Male ; Metabolic disease ; Metagenomics - methods ; Microbiota ; Microbiota (Symbiotic organisms) ; Obesity ; Obesity - etiology ; Obesity - microbiology ; Rats, Sprague-Dawley ; Western cafeteria diet
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descriptionScope Overconsumption of energy‐rich food is a major contributor to the obesity epidemic. The eating habits of many people are characterized by the cycling between overconsumption of energy‐rich foods and dieting, the effects of which on the microbiota are currently unknown. Methods and results We compared the fecal microbiota of rats either continuously fed chow or palatable cafeteria diet to a “cycled” group switched between the two diets (chow for 4, cafeteria for 3 days/wk, n = 12/group) over 16 wk. Enriched bacterial metabolic pathways were predicted, and a range of metabolic parameters was correlated to microbial taxa and pathways. Cycled rats showed large excursions in food intake on each diet switch. When switched from chow to cafeteria, they overconsumed, and when switched back to chow they underconsumed relative to those maintained on the two diets. Metabolic parameters of cycled rats were intermediate between those of the other diet groups (p < 0.05). The microbiota of cycled rats was nearly indistinguishable from rats under constant cafeteria diet, and both groups were significantly different to the chow group. Correlation analyses identified microbial metabolic pathways associated with an obese phenotype. Conclusion These data suggest that continuous or intermittent exposure to palatable foods have similar effects on the gut microbiota. The gut bacteria of rats either continuously fed standard chow or palatable cafeteria diet are compared to a third group cycled between these diets (4/3 days each wk) over 16 wks. Body weight and metabolic parameters of cycled rats were intermediate between those of the other diet groups. Gut bacteria of cycled rats were nearly indistinguishable from rats under constant cafeteria diet, and both groups were different to the chow group. Thus, any exposure to junk food affects gut bacteria.
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notesThese authors contributed equally to this work.
abstractScope Overconsumption of energy‐rich food is a major contributor to the obesity epidemic. The eating habits of many people are characterized by the cycling between overconsumption of energy‐rich foods and dieting, the effects of which on the microbiota are currently unknown. Methods and results We compared the fecal microbiota of rats either continuously fed chow or palatable cafeteria diet to a “cycled” group switched between the two diets (chow for 4, cafeteria for 3 days/wk, n = 12/group) over 16 wk. Enriched bacterial metabolic pathways were predicted, and a range of metabolic parameters was correlated to microbial taxa and pathways. Cycled rats showed large excursions in food intake on each diet switch. When switched from chow to cafeteria, they overconsumed, and when switched back to chow they underconsumed relative to those maintained on the two diets. Metabolic parameters of cycled rats were intermediate between those of the other diet groups (p < 0.05). The microbiota of cycled rats was nearly indistinguishable from rats under constant cafeteria diet, and both groups were significantly different to the chow group. Correlation analyses identified microbial metabolic pathways associated with an obese phenotype. Conclusion These data suggest that continuous or intermittent exposure to palatable foods have similar effects on the gut microbiota. The gut bacteria of rats either continuously fed standard chow or palatable cafeteria diet are compared to a third group cycled between these diets (4/3 days each wk) over 16 wks. Body weight and metabolic parameters of cycled rats were intermediate between those of the other diet groups. Gut bacteria of cycled rats were nearly indistinguishable from rats under constant cafeteria diet, and both groups were different to the chow group. Thus, any exposure to junk food affects gut bacteria.
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