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The power of PowerPoint: A visual perspective on meaning making in strategy

: Relying on ethnographic data from two consulting engagements, we find that strategists use three (depiction, juxtaposition, and salience) to create PowerPoint slides. These visual mechanisms prompt meaning‐making through the conversations they stimulate, creating . As participants react to visuals... Full description

Journal Title: Strategic Management Journal March 2018, Vol.39(3), pp.894-921
Main Author: Knight, Eric
Other Authors: Paroutis, Sotirios , Heracleous, Loizos
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language:
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0143-2095 ; E-ISSN: 1097-0266 ; DOI: 10.1002/smj.2727
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recordid: wj10.1002/smj.2727
title: The power of PowerPoint: A visual perspective on meaning making in strategy
format: Article
creator:
  • Knight, Eric
  • Paroutis, Sotirios
  • Heracleous, Loizos
subjects:
  • Powerpoint
  • Strategy Consulting
  • Strategy As Practice
  • Strategy Process
  • Visual Semiotics
ispartof: Strategic Management Journal, March 2018, Vol.39(3), pp.894-921
description: : Relying on ethnographic data from two consulting engagements, we find that strategists use three (depiction, juxtaposition, and salience) to create PowerPoint slides. These visual mechanisms prompt meaning‐making through the conversations they stimulate, creating . As participants react to visuals, they enact revised interpretations of the strategy, reflecting . Based on the interactions among these three subprocesses (, and ), we develop a process model for how visuals influence meaning making in strategy engagements. We contribute to existing strategy practice and process studies by explaining how visuals help broker divergent interpretations of a strategy and give rise to new understandings, especially when issues are politically sensitive or analytically complex. : The purpose of this study is to understand how strategists use visual information (specifically in PowerPoint slides), and its effects on the strategy process. We find that strategy conversations are influenced by the techniques strategists use to create slides, which in turn shape the kinds of follow‐up actions taken. The implications are that: (a) PowerPoint slides can be designed to help tackle complex issues, for instance, when participants have divergent opinions or in politically sensitive situations, and (b) those who craft and edit PowerPoint slides strongly influence the direction of the strategy. The skillful use of PowerPoint is therefore crucial in allowing managers to shape the nature and speed of strategy engagements. Video
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0143-2095 ; E-ISSN: 1097-0266 ; DOI: 10.1002/smj.2727
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0143-2095
  • 01432095
  • 1097-0266
  • 10970266
url: Link


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subjectPowerpoint ; Strategy Consulting ; Strategy As Practice ; Strategy Process ; Visual Semiotics
description: Relying on ethnographic data from two consulting engagements, we find that strategists use three (depiction, juxtaposition, and salience) to create PowerPoint slides. These visual mechanisms prompt meaning‐making through the conversations they stimulate, creating . As participants react to visuals, they enact revised interpretations of the strategy, reflecting . Based on the interactions among these three subprocesses (, and ), we develop a process model for how visuals influence meaning making in strategy engagements. We contribute to existing strategy practice and process studies by explaining how visuals help broker divergent interpretations of a strategy and give rise to new understandings, especially when issues are politically sensitive or analytically complex. : The purpose of this study is to understand how strategists use visual information (specifically in PowerPoint slides), and its effects on the strategy process. We find that strategy conversations are influenced by the techniques strategists use to create slides, which in turn shape the kinds of follow‐up actions taken. The implications are that: (a) PowerPoint slides can be designed to help tackle complex issues, for instance, when participants have divergent opinions or in politically sensitive situations, and (b) those who craft and edit PowerPoint slides strongly influence the direction of the strategy. The skillful use of PowerPoint is therefore crucial in allowing managers to shape the nature and speed of strategy engagements. Video
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titleThe power of PowerPoint: A visual perspective on meaning making in strategy
description: Relying on ethnographic data from two consulting engagements, we find that strategists use three (depiction, juxtaposition, and salience) to create PowerPoint slides. These visual mechanisms prompt meaning‐making through the conversations they stimulate, creating . As participants react to visuals, they enact revised interpretations of the strategy, reflecting . Based on the interactions among these three subprocesses (, and ), we develop a process model for how visuals influence meaning making in strategy engagements. We contribute to existing strategy practice and process studies by explaining how visuals help broker divergent interpretations of a strategy and give rise to new understandings, especially when issues are politically sensitive or analytically complex. : The purpose of this study is to understand how strategists use visual information (specifically in PowerPoint slides), and its effects on the strategy process. We find that strategy conversations are influenced by the techniques strategists use to create slides, which in turn shape the kinds of follow‐up actions taken. The implications are that: (a) PowerPoint slides can be designed to help tackle complex issues, for instance, when participants have divergent opinions or in politically sensitive situations, and (b) those who craft and edit PowerPoint slides strongly influence the direction of the strategy. The skillful use of PowerPoint is therefore crucial in allowing managers to shape the nature and speed of strategy engagements. Video
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abstract: Relying on ethnographic data from two consulting engagements, we find that strategists use three (depiction, juxtaposition, and salience) to create PowerPoint slides. These visual mechanisms prompt meaning‐making through the conversations they stimulate, creating . As participants react to visuals, they enact revised interpretations of the strategy, reflecting . Based on the interactions among these three subprocesses (, and ), we develop a process model for how visuals influence meaning making in strategy engagements. We contribute to existing strategy practice and process studies by explaining how visuals help broker divergent interpretations of a strategy and give rise to new understandings, especially when issues are politically sensitive or analytically complex. : The purpose of this study is to understand how strategists use visual information (specifically in PowerPoint slides), and its effects on the strategy process. We find that strategy conversations are influenced by the techniques strategists use to create slides, which in turn shape the kinds of follow‐up actions taken. The implications are that: (a) PowerPoint slides can be designed to help tackle complex issues, for instance, when participants have divergent opinions or in politically sensitive situations, and (b) those who craft and edit PowerPoint slides strongly influence the direction of the strategy. The skillful use of PowerPoint is therefore crucial in allowing managers to shape the nature and speed of strategy engagements. Video
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