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National survey data can be used to measure trends in population alcohol consumption in Australia

: To assess the accuracy of the National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS) at capturing trends in alcohol consumption at the population level, using apparent per capita alcohol consumption as a benchmark. : Data was from five waves of the NDSHS (2001–2013), with estimates of per capita alcohol... Full description

Journal Title: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health June 2016, Vol.40(3), pp.233-235
Main Author: Livingston, Michael
Other Authors: Dietze, Paul
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 1326-0200 ; E-ISSN: 1753-6405 ; DOI: 10.1111/1753-6405.12511
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recordid: wj10.1111/1753-6405.12511
title: National survey data can be used to measure trends in population alcohol consumption in Australia
format: Article
creator:
  • Livingston, Michael
  • Dietze, Paul
subjects:
  • Alcohol
  • Trends
  • Surveys
ispartof: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, June 2016, Vol.40(3), pp.233-235
description: : To assess the accuracy of the National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS) at capturing trends in alcohol consumption at the population level, using apparent per capita alcohol consumption as a benchmark. : Data was from five waves of the NDSHS (2001–2013), with estimates of per capita alcohol consumption derived from the detailed graduated frequency alcohol questions. Trends are compared with per capita measures, and trends in both series compared. Further analyses explore whether recent trends in consumption are consistent across age groups. : The NDSHS survey estimates still track apparent consumption well, which increases between 2001 and 2007 and then declines to 2013. Since 2007, survey estimates show a 10.5% decline in per capita alcohol consumption, compared with 8.9% in ABS data. Two‐thirds of the decline came from reductions in drinking among respondents under 30. : NDSHS data provide reasonably accurate estimates of trends in Australian population alcohol consumption. Survey data are critical to understanding the composition of overarching trends, with these analyses demonstrating substantial variation by age. : Survey data are a crucial tool in monitoring Australian alcohol consumption, despite their inherent limitations.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1326-0200 ; E-ISSN: 1753-6405 ; DOI: 10.1111/1753-6405.12511
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1326-0200
  • 13260200
  • 1753-6405
  • 17536405
url: Link


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description: To assess the accuracy of the National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS) at capturing trends in alcohol consumption at the population level, using apparent per capita alcohol consumption as a benchmark. : Data was from five waves of the NDSHS (2001–2013), with estimates of per capita alcohol consumption derived from the detailed graduated frequency alcohol questions. Trends are compared with per capita measures, and trends in both series compared. Further analyses explore whether recent trends in consumption are consistent across age groups. : The NDSHS survey estimates still track apparent consumption well, which increases between 2001 and 2007 and then declines to 2013. Since 2007, survey estimates show a 10.5% decline in per capita alcohol consumption, compared with 8.9% in ABS data. Two‐thirds of the decline came from reductions in drinking among respondents under 30. : NDSHS data provide reasonably accurate estimates of trends in Australian population alcohol consumption. Survey data are critical to understanding the composition of overarching trends, with these analyses demonstrating substantial variation by age. : Survey data are a crucial tool in monitoring Australian alcohol consumption, despite their inherent limitations.
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abstract: To assess the accuracy of the National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS) at capturing trends in alcohol consumption at the population level, using apparent per capita alcohol consumption as a benchmark. : Data was from five waves of the NDSHS (2001–2013), with estimates of per capita alcohol consumption derived from the detailed graduated frequency alcohol questions. Trends are compared with per capita measures, and trends in both series compared. Further analyses explore whether recent trends in consumption are consistent across age groups. : The NDSHS survey estimates still track apparent consumption well, which increases between 2001 and 2007 and then declines to 2013. Since 2007, survey estimates show a 10.5% decline in per capita alcohol consumption, compared with 8.9% in ABS data. Two‐thirds of the decline came from reductions in drinking among respondents under 30. : NDSHS data provide reasonably accurate estimates of trends in Australian population alcohol consumption. Survey data are critical to understanding the composition of overarching trends, with these analyses demonstrating substantial variation by age. : Survey data are a crucial tool in monitoring Australian alcohol consumption, despite their inherent limitations.
doi10.1111/1753-6405.12511
pages233-235
date2016-06