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Alcohol Attributable Fraction for Injury Morbidity from the Dose‐Response Relationship of Acute Alcohol Consumption: Emergency Department Data from 18 Countries

To purchase or authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/add.13031/abstract Byline: Cheryl J. Cherpitel, Yu Ye, Jason Bond, Guilherme Borges, Maristela Monteiro, Patricia Chou, Wei Hao Keywords: Alcohol; alcohol attributable fra... Full description

Journal Title: Addiction November 2015, Vol.110(11), pp.1724-1732
Main Author: Cherpitel, Cheryl J.
Other Authors: Ye, Yu , Bond, Jason , Borges, Guilherme , Monteiro, Maristela , Chou, Patricia , Hao, Wei
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 0965-2140 ; E-ISSN: 1360-0443 ; DOI: 10.1111/add.13031
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title: Alcohol Attributable Fraction for Injury Morbidity from the Dose‐Response Relationship of Acute Alcohol Consumption: Emergency Department Data from 18 Countries
format: Article
creator:
  • Cherpitel, Cheryl J.
  • Ye, Yu
  • Bond, Jason
  • Borges, Guilherme
  • Monteiro, Maristela
  • Chou, Patricia
  • Hao, Wei
subjects:
  • Alcohol
  • Alcohol Attributable Fraction
  • Dose‐Response
  • Emergency Department
  • Gender
  • Injury
  • Motor Vehicle
  • Violence
ispartof: Addiction, November 2015, Vol.110(11), pp.1724-1732
description: To purchase or authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/add.13031/abstract Byline: Cheryl J. Cherpitel, Yu Ye, Jason Bond, Guilherme Borges, Maristela Monteiro, Patricia Chou, Wei Hao Keywords: Alcohol; alcohol attributable fraction; dose-response; emergency department; gender; injury; motor vehicle; violence Abstract Aims To calculate the alcohol-attributable fraction (AAF) of injury morbidity by volume of consumption prior to injury based on newly reported relative risk (RR) estimates. Design AAF estimates based on the dose-response RR estimates obtained from previous pair-matched case-crossover fractional polynomial analysis of mean volume in volume categories were calculated from the prevalence of drinking prior to injury in each volume category. Setting Thirty-seven emergency departments (EDs) across 18 countries. Participants Probability samples of patients, with equal representation of each shift for each day of the week, totaling 14,026 who arrived at the ED within six hours of injury from ED studies conducted between 2001 and 2011. Measurements AAF was analyzed by gender, age (18-30; >30), cause of injury (traffic, assault, fall, other), and country detrimental drinking pattern (DDP). Findings For the EDs analyzed, 16.4% of all injuries were estimated to be attributable to alcohol, and the AAF did not vary by age but was over twice as large for males (20.6%; 19.3-21.8) than for females (8.6%; 7.5-9.7%). While females were at greater risk of injury than males at higher volume levels, lower prevalence of women drinking at higher levels contributed to overall lower AAF for women. Assault-related injuries showed the largest AAF (44.1%; 37.6-42.6). AAF was slightly higher for injuries from falls (14.3%; 12.9-15.7) than motor vehicle crashes (11.1%; 9.3-12.9). AAF was higher in those countries with a DDP of 3 (18.6; 17.5-19.7) and 4 (19.4%; 17.3-21.6) than those with a DDP of 2 (12.0%; 10.5-13.5). Conclusions Alcohol-attributable injuries presenting in emergency departments are higher for males than females, for violence-related injuries compared with other types of injury, and for countries with more detrimental drinking patterns compared with those with less detrimental patterns. Supporting information: Additional Supporting Information may be found in the online version of this article Table S1 Characteristics of ED samples by study (n=14,026.sub.1) Figure S1 Comparison between
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identifier: ISSN: 0965-2140 ; E-ISSN: 1360-0443 ; DOI: 10.1111/add.13031
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issn:
  • 0965-2140
  • 09652140
  • 1360-0443
  • 13600443
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titleAlcohol Attributable Fraction for Injury Morbidity from the Dose‐Response Relationship of Acute Alcohol Consumption: Emergency Department Data from 18 Countries
creatorCherpitel, Cheryl J. ; Ye, Yu ; Bond, Jason ; Borges, Guilherme ; Monteiro, Maristela ; Chou, Patricia ; Hao, Wei
ispartofAddiction, November 2015, Vol.110(11), pp.1724-1732
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subjectAlcohol ; Alcohol Attributable Fraction ; Dose‐Response ; Emergency Department ; Gender ; Injury ; Motor Vehicle ; Violence
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descriptionTo purchase or authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/add.13031/abstract Byline: Cheryl J. Cherpitel, Yu Ye, Jason Bond, Guilherme Borges, Maristela Monteiro, Patricia Chou, Wei Hao Keywords: Alcohol; alcohol attributable fraction; dose-response; emergency department; gender; injury; motor vehicle; violence Abstract Aims To calculate the alcohol-attributable fraction (AAF) of injury morbidity by volume of consumption prior to injury based on newly reported relative risk (RR) estimates. Design AAF estimates based on the dose-response RR estimates obtained from previous pair-matched case-crossover fractional polynomial analysis of mean volume in volume categories were calculated from the prevalence of drinking prior to injury in each volume category. Setting Thirty-seven emergency departments (EDs) across 18 countries. Participants Probability samples of patients, with equal representation of each shift for each day of the week, totaling 14,026 who arrived at the ED within six hours of injury from ED studies conducted between 2001 and 2011. Measurements AAF was analyzed by gender, age (18-30; >30), cause of injury (traffic, assault, fall, other), and country detrimental drinking pattern (DDP). Findings For the EDs analyzed, 16.4% of all injuries were estimated to be attributable to alcohol, and the AAF did not vary by age but was over twice as large for males (20.6%; 19.3-21.8) than for females (8.6%; 7.5-9.7%). While females were at greater risk of injury than males at higher volume levels, lower prevalence of women drinking at higher levels contributed to overall lower AAF for women. Assault-related injuries showed the largest AAF (44.1%; 37.6-42.6). AAF was slightly higher for injuries from falls (14.3%; 12.9-15.7) than motor vehicle crashes (11.1%; 9.3-12.9). AAF was higher in those countries with a DDP of 3 (18.6; 17.5-19.7) and 4 (19.4%; 17.3-21.6) than those with a DDP of 2 (12.0%; 10.5-13.5). Conclusions Alcohol-attributable injuries presenting in emergency departments are higher for males than females, for violence-related injuries compared with other types of injury, and for countries with more detrimental drinking patterns compared with those with less detrimental patterns. Supporting information: Additional Supporting Information may be found in the online version of this article Table S1 Characteristics of ED samples by study (n=14,026.sub.1) Figure S1 Comparison between Relative Risk Curves from Categorical Step-function and Fractional Polynomials whose functional form is shown at the bottom of the graph, for total ED sample Figure S2 Comparison between Relative Risk Curves from Categorical Step-function and Fractional Polynomials whose functional form is shown at the bottom of the graph, by Gender and Age Separately Figure S3 Comparison between Relative Risk Curves from Categorical Step-function and Fractional Polynomials whose functional form is shown at the bottom of the graph, by Cause of Injury Figure S4 Comparison between Relative Risk Curves from Categorical Step-function and Fractional Polynomials whose functional form is shown at the bottom of the graph, by Detrimental Drinking Pattern CAPTION(S): Supporting info item
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