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Soil respiration in six temperate forests in China

Scaling soil respiration (), the major CO source to the atmosphere from terrestrial ecosystems, from chamber‐based measurements to ecosystems requires studies on variations and correlations of from various biomes and across geographic regions. However, few studies on are available for Chinese temper... Full description

Journal Title: Global Change Biology November 2006, Vol.12(11), pp.2103-2114
Main Author: Wang, Chuankuan
Other Authors: Yang, Jinyan , Zhang, Quanzhi
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 1354-1013 ; E-ISSN: 1365-2486 ; DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2486.2006.01234.x
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recordid: wj10.1111/j.1365-2486.2006.01234.x
title: Soil respiration in six temperate forests in China
format: Article
creator:
  • Wang, Chuankuan
  • Yang, Jinyan
  • Zhang, Quanzhi
subjects:
  • Carbon Cycle
  • Soil Carbon
  • Soil Co Flux
  • Soil Respiration
  • Temperate Forest
ispartof: Global Change Biology, November 2006, Vol.12(11), pp.2103-2114
description: Scaling soil respiration (), the major CO source to the atmosphere from terrestrial ecosystems, from chamber‐based measurements to ecosystems requires studies on variations and correlations of from various biomes and across geographic regions. However, few studies on are available for Chinese temperate forest despite the importance of this forest in the national and global carbon budgets. In this study, we conducted 18‐month measurements during 2004–2005 in six temperate forest types, representing the typical secondary forest ecosystems across various site conditions in northeastern China: Mongolian oak ( Fisch.), aspen‐birch ( Dode and Suk.), mixed deciduous (no dominant tree species), hardwood (dominated by Rupr., Maxim., and Rupr.) forests, Korean pine ( Sieb. et Zucc.) and Dahurian larch ( Rupr.) plantations. Our specific objectives were to: (1) explore relationships of against soil temperature and water content for the six forest ecosystems, (2) quantify annual soil surface CO flux and its relations to belowground carbon storage, (3) examine seasonal variations in and related environmental factors, and (4) quantify among‐ and within‐ecosystem variations in . The was positively correlated to soil temperature in all forest types, and was significantly influenced by the interactions of soil temperature and water content in the pine, larch, and mixed deciduous forests. The sensitivity of to soil temperature at 10 cm depth () ranged from 2.61 in the oak forest to 3.75 in the aspen‐birch forests. The tended to increase with soil water content until reaching a threshold, and then decline. The annual for the larch, pine, hardwood, oak, mixed deciduous, and aspen‐birch forests averaged 403, 514, 781, 785, 786, and 813 g C m yr, respectively. The annual of the broadleaved forests was 72% greater than that of the coniferous forests. The annual was positively correlated to soil organic carbon (SOC) concentration at O horizon (=0.868) and total biomass of roots
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1354-1013 ; E-ISSN: 1365-2486 ; DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2486.2006.01234.x
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1354-1013
  • 13541013
  • 1365-2486
  • 13652486
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titleSoil respiration in six temperate forests in China
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subjectCarbon Cycle ; Soil Carbon ; Soil Co Flux ; Soil Respiration ; Temperate Forest
descriptionScaling soil respiration (), the major CO source to the atmosphere from terrestrial ecosystems, from chamber‐based measurements to ecosystems requires studies on variations and correlations of from various biomes and across geographic regions. However, few studies on are available for Chinese temperate forest despite the importance of this forest in the national and global carbon budgets. In this study, we conducted 18‐month measurements during 2004–2005 in six temperate forest types, representing the typical secondary forest ecosystems across various site conditions in northeastern China: Mongolian oak ( Fisch.), aspen‐birch ( Dode and Suk.), mixed deciduous (no dominant tree species), hardwood (dominated by Rupr., Maxim., and Rupr.) forests, Korean pine ( Sieb. et Zucc.) and Dahurian larch ( Rupr.) plantations. Our specific objectives were to: (1) explore relationships of against soil temperature and water content for the six forest ecosystems, (2) quantify annual soil surface CO flux and its relations to belowground carbon storage, (3) examine seasonal variations in and related environmental factors, and (4) quantify among‐ and within‐ecosystem variations in . The was positively correlated to soil temperature in all forest types, and was significantly influenced by the interactions of soil temperature and water content in the pine, larch, and mixed deciduous forests. The sensitivity of to soil temperature at 10 cm depth () ranged from 2.61 in the oak forest to 3.75 in the aspen‐birch forests. The tended to increase with soil water content until reaching a threshold, and then decline. The annual for the larch, pine, hardwood, oak, mixed deciduous, and aspen‐birch forests averaged 403, 514, 781, 785, 786, and 813 g C m yr, respectively. The annual of the broadleaved forests was 72% greater than that of the coniferous forests. The annual was positively correlated to soil organic carbon (SOC) concentration at O horizon (=0.868) and total biomass of roots <0.5 cm in diameter (=0.748). The coefficient of variation (CV) of among forest types averaged 25% across the 18‐month measurements. The CV of within plots varied from 20% to 27%, significantly (<0.001) greater than those among plots (9–15%), indicating the importance of the fine‐scaled heterogeneity in . This study emphasized that variations in soil respiration and potential sampling bias should be appropriately tackled for accurate soil CO flux estimates.
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descriptionScaling soil respiration (), the major CO source to the atmosphere from terrestrial ecosystems, from chamber‐based measurements to ecosystems requires studies on variations and correlations of from various biomes and across geographic regions. However, few studies on are available for Chinese temperate forest despite the importance of this forest in the national and global carbon budgets. In this study, we conducted 18‐month measurements during 2004–2005 in six temperate forest types, representing the typical secondary forest ecosystems across various site conditions in northeastern China: Mongolian oak ( Fisch.), aspen‐birch ( Dode and Suk.), mixed deciduous (no dominant tree species), hardwood (dominated by Rupr., Maxim., and Rupr.) forests, Korean pine ( Sieb. et Zucc.) and Dahurian larch ( Rupr.) plantations. Our specific objectives were to: (1) explore relationships of against soil temperature and water content for the six forest ecosystems, (2) quantify annual soil surface CO flux and its relations to belowground carbon storage, (3) examine seasonal variations in and related environmental factors, and (4) quantify among‐ and within‐ecosystem variations in . The was positively correlated to soil temperature in all forest types, and was significantly influenced by the interactions of soil temperature and water content in the pine, larch, and mixed deciduous forests. The sensitivity of to soil temperature at 10 cm depth () ranged from 2.61 in the oak forest to 3.75 in the aspen‐birch forests. The tended to increase with soil water content until reaching a threshold, and then decline. The annual for the larch, pine, hardwood, oak, mixed deciduous, and aspen‐birch forests averaged 403, 514, 781, 785, 786, and 813 g C m yr, respectively. The annual of the broadleaved forests was 72% greater than that of the coniferous forests. The annual was positively correlated to soil organic carbon (SOC) concentration at O horizon (=0.868) and total biomass of roots <0.5 cm in diameter (=0.748). The coefficient of variation (CV) of among forest types averaged 25% across the 18‐month measurements. The CV of within plots varied from 20% to 27%, significantly (<0.001) greater than those among plots (9–15%), indicating the importance of the fine‐scaled heterogeneity in . This study emphasized that variations in soil respiration and potential sampling bias should be appropriately tackled for accurate soil CO flux estimates.
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abstractScaling soil respiration (), the major CO source to the atmosphere from terrestrial ecosystems, from chamber‐based measurements to ecosystems requires studies on variations and correlations of from various biomes and across geographic regions. However, few studies on are available for Chinese temperate forest despite the importance of this forest in the national and global carbon budgets. In this study, we conducted 18‐month measurements during 2004–2005 in six temperate forest types, representing the typical secondary forest ecosystems across various site conditions in northeastern China: Mongolian oak ( Fisch.), aspen‐birch ( Dode and Suk.), mixed deciduous (no dominant tree species), hardwood (dominated by Rupr., Maxim., and Rupr.) forests, Korean pine ( Sieb. et Zucc.) and Dahurian larch ( Rupr.) plantations. Our specific objectives were to: (1) explore relationships of against soil temperature and water content for the six forest ecosystems, (2) quantify annual soil surface CO flux and its relations to belowground carbon storage, (3) examine seasonal variations in and related environmental factors, and (4) quantify among‐ and within‐ecosystem variations in . The was positively correlated to soil temperature in all forest types, and was significantly influenced by the interactions of soil temperature and water content in the pine, larch, and mixed deciduous forests. The sensitivity of to soil temperature at 10 cm depth () ranged from 2.61 in the oak forest to 3.75 in the aspen‐birch forests. The tended to increase with soil water content until reaching a threshold, and then decline. The annual for the larch, pine, hardwood, oak, mixed deciduous, and aspen‐birch forests averaged 403, 514, 781, 785, 786, and 813 g C m yr, respectively. The annual of the broadleaved forests was 72% greater than that of the coniferous forests. The annual was positively correlated to soil organic carbon (SOC) concentration at O horizon (=0.868) and total biomass of roots <0.5 cm in diameter (=0.748). The coefficient of variation (CV) of among forest types averaged 25% across the 18‐month measurements. The CV of within plots varied from 20% to 27%, significantly (<0.001) greater than those among plots (9–15%), indicating the importance of the fine‐scaled heterogeneity in . This study emphasized that variations in soil respiration and potential sampling bias should be appropriately tackled for accurate soil CO flux estimates.
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pubBlackwell Publishing Ltd
doi10.1111/j.1365-2486.2006.01234.x
pages2103-2114
date2006-11