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Marital Well‐being and Religiousness as Mediated by Relational Virtue and Equality

This study investigated religiousness and couple well‐being as mediated by relational virtue and equality. Relational spiritual framework theory posits that religiousness is associated with couple well‐being through relational virtues (e.g., forgiveness, commitment, and sacrifice). Theories of relat... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Marriage and Family February 2013, Vol.75(1), pp.164-177
Main Author: Day, Randal D.
Other Authors: Acock, Alan
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 0022-2445 ; E-ISSN: 1741-3737 ; DOI: 10.1111/j.1741-3737.2012.01033.x
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recordid: wj10.1111/j.1741-3737.2012.01033.x
title: Marital Well‐being and Religiousness as Mediated by Relational Virtue and Equality
format: Article
creator:
  • Day, Randal D.
  • Acock, Alan
subjects:
  • Marital Equality
  • Marital Well‐Being
  • Relational Virtue
  • Religion
ispartof: Journal of Marriage and Family, February 2013, Vol.75(1), pp.164-177
description: This study investigated religiousness and couple well‐being as mediated by relational virtue and equality. Relational spiritual framework theory posits that religiousness is associated with couple well‐being through relational virtues (e.g., forgiveness, commitment, and sacrifice). Theories of relational inequality postulate that religion decreases couple well‐being and indirectly lessens couple well‐being. Data from a 3‐year longitudinal community sample of 354 married couples were used. The authors found that religiousness's relationship to couple well‐being was fully mediated by relational virtue but was not connected to relational inequality. They also found that relational inequality was associated with women's conflict, men's conflict, and marital instability. They did not find that higher religiousness benefits marital outcomes directly. Although these findings do not support the idea that religious activities are directly associated with stronger relationships, the data did show that religiousness can contribute to expressed relational virtue, and relational virtue in turn is associated with marital well‐being.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0022-2445 ; E-ISSN: 1741-3737 ; DOI: 10.1111/j.1741-3737.2012.01033.x
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0022-2445
  • 00222445
  • 1741-3737
  • 17413737
url: Link


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subjectMarital Equality ; Marital Well‐Being ; Relational Virtue ; Religion
descriptionThis study investigated religiousness and couple well‐being as mediated by relational virtue and equality. Relational spiritual framework theory posits that religiousness is associated with couple well‐being through relational virtues (e.g., forgiveness, commitment, and sacrifice). Theories of relational inequality postulate that religion decreases couple well‐being and indirectly lessens couple well‐being. Data from a 3‐year longitudinal community sample of 354 married couples were used. The authors found that religiousness's relationship to couple well‐being was fully mediated by relational virtue but was not connected to relational inequality. They also found that relational inequality was associated with women's conflict, men's conflict, and marital instability. They did not find that higher religiousness benefits marital outcomes directly. Although these findings do not support the idea that religious activities are directly associated with stronger relationships, the data did show that religiousness can contribute to expressed relational virtue, and relational virtue in turn is associated with marital well‐being.
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abstractThis study investigated religiousness and couple well‐being as mediated by relational virtue and equality. Relational spiritual framework theory posits that religiousness is associated with couple well‐being through relational virtues (e.g., forgiveness, commitment, and sacrifice). Theories of relational inequality postulate that religion decreases couple well‐being and indirectly lessens couple well‐being. Data from a 3‐year longitudinal community sample of 354 married couples were used. The authors found that religiousness's relationship to couple well‐being was fully mediated by relational virtue but was not connected to relational inequality. They also found that relational inequality was associated with women's conflict, men's conflict, and marital instability. They did not find that higher religiousness benefits marital outcomes directly. Although these findings do not support the idea that religious activities are directly associated with stronger relationships, the data did show that religiousness can contribute to expressed relational virtue, and relational virtue in turn is associated with marital well‐being.
copOxford, UK
pubBlackwell Publishing Ltd
doi10.1111/j.1741-3737.2012.01033.x
pages164-177
date2013-02