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Effect of protein intake on bone and muscle mass in the elderly

The aging process is frequently characterized by an involuntary loss of muscle (sarcopenia) and bone (osteoporosis) mass. Both chronic diseases are associated with decreased metabolic rate, increased risk of falls/fracture, and, as a result, increased morbidity and loss of independence in the elderl... Full description

Journal Title: Nutrition Reviews October 2010, Vol.68(10), pp.616-623
Main Author: De Souza Genaro, Patrícia
Other Authors: Martini, Lígia Araújo
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 0029-6643 ; E-ISSN: 1753-4887 ; DOI: 10.1111/j.1753-4887.2010.00321.x
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recordid: wj10.1111/j.1753-4887.2010.00321.x
title: Effect of protein intake on bone and muscle mass in the elderly
format: Article
creator:
  • De Souza Genaro, Patrícia
  • Martini, Lígia Araújo
subjects:
  • Bone Mass
  • Elderly
  • Muscle Mass
  • Protein Intake
ispartof: Nutrition Reviews, October 2010, Vol.68(10), pp.616-623
description: The aging process is frequently characterized by an involuntary loss of muscle (sarcopenia) and bone (osteoporosis) mass. Both chronic diseases are associated with decreased metabolic rate, increased risk of falls/fracture, and, as a result, increased morbidity and loss of independence in the elderly. The quality and quantity of protein intake affects bone and muscle mass in several ways and there is evidence that increased essential amino acid or protein availability can enhance muscle protein synthesis and anabolism, as well as improve bone homeostasis in older subjects. A thorough evaluation of renal function is important, since renal function decreases with age. Finally, protein and calcium intake should be considered in the prevention or treatment of the chronic diseases osteoporosis and sarcopenia.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0029-6643 ; E-ISSN: 1753-4887 ; DOI: 10.1111/j.1753-4887.2010.00321.x
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0029-6643
  • 00296643
  • 1753-4887
  • 17534887
url: Link


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subjectBone Mass ; Elderly ; Muscle Mass ; Protein Intake
descriptionThe aging process is frequently characterized by an involuntary loss of muscle (sarcopenia) and bone (osteoporosis) mass. Both chronic diseases are associated with decreased metabolic rate, increased risk of falls/fracture, and, as a result, increased morbidity and loss of independence in the elderly. The quality and quantity of protein intake affects bone and muscle mass in several ways and there is evidence that increased essential amino acid or protein availability can enhance muscle protein synthesis and anabolism, as well as improve bone homeostasis in older subjects. A thorough evaluation of renal function is important, since renal function decreases with age. Finally, protein and calcium intake should be considered in the prevention or treatment of the chronic diseases osteoporosis and sarcopenia.
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abstractThe aging process is frequently characterized by an involuntary loss of muscle (sarcopenia) and bone (osteoporosis) mass. Both chronic diseases are associated with decreased metabolic rate, increased risk of falls/fracture, and, as a result, increased morbidity and loss of independence in the elderly. The quality and quantity of protein intake affects bone and muscle mass in several ways and there is evidence that increased essential amino acid or protein availability can enhance muscle protein synthesis and anabolism, as well as improve bone homeostasis in older subjects. A thorough evaluation of renal function is important, since renal function decreases with age. Finally, protein and calcium intake should be considered in the prevention or treatment of the chronic diseases osteoporosis and sarcopenia.
copMalden, USA
pubBlackwell Publishing Inc
doi10.1111/j.1753-4887.2010.00321.x
pages616-623
date2010-10