schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Seroprevalence of Japanese Encephalitis Virus and Risk Factors Associated with Seropositivity in Pigs in Four Mountain Districts in Nepal*

Japanese encephalitis was recently reported from individuals in the mountain districts of Nepal without travel history to Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) endemic areas. We performed a cross‐sectional study to estimate the seroprevalence of JEV in pigs and subsequently conducted a survey of farmers... Full description

Journal Title: Zoonoses and Public Health September 2012, Vol.59(6), pp.393-400
Main Author: Thakur, K. K.
Other Authors: Pant, G. R. , Wang, L. , Hill, C. A. , Pogranichniy, R. M. , Manandhar, S. , Johnson, A. J.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language:
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 1863-1959 ; E-ISSN: 1863-2378 ; DOI: 10.1111/j.1863-2378.2012.01456.x
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: wj10.1111/j.1863-2378.2012.01456.x
title: Seroprevalence of Japanese Encephalitis Virus and Risk Factors Associated with Seropositivity in Pigs in Four Mountain Districts in Nepal*
format: Article
creator:
  • Thakur, K. K.
  • Pant, G. R.
  • Wang, L.
  • Hill, C. A.
  • Pogranichniy, R. M.
  • Manandhar, S.
  • Johnson, A. J.
subjects:
  • Japanese Encephalitis Virus
  • Arbovirus
  • Pigs
  • Reservoir
  • Culex Mosquito
ispartof: Zoonoses and Public Health, September 2012, Vol.59(6), pp.393-400
description: Japanese encephalitis was recently reported from individuals in the mountain districts of Nepal without travel history to Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) endemic areas. We performed a cross‐sectional study to estimate the seroprevalence of JEV in pigs and subsequently conducted a survey of farmers to identify risk factors associated with seropositivity. In July and August, 2010, 454 pig serum samples were collected and tested by competitive ELISA. Data from a 35‐question survey of 109 pig owners were analysed using multivariate logistic regression. Seventy‐six (16.7, 95% CI 13.6–20.4) pigs tested positive for anti‐JEV antibodies, none of which had been vaccinated against JEV or sourced from JEV endemic areas. Risk factors associated with JEV seropositivity were ‘summer abortion’, ‘wells as a water source’, ‘urban location’, ‘reported presence of mosquitoes’ and ‘lower elevation’. Our results suggest that JEV is likely circulating in the mountain districts of Nepal, and that locally acquired JEV should be considered a risk for residents and travellers in these areas.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1863-1959 ; E-ISSN: 1863-2378 ; DOI: 10.1111/j.1863-2378.2012.01456.x
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1863-1959
  • 18631959
  • 1863-2378
  • 18632378
url: Link


@attributes
ID1458037859
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid10.1111/j.1863-2378.2012.01456.x
sourceidwj
recordidTN_wj10.1111/j.1863-2378.2012.01456.x
sourcesystemPC
pqid1038611822
galeid306460381
display
typearticle
titleSeroprevalence of Japanese Encephalitis Virus and Risk Factors Associated with Seropositivity in Pigs in Four Mountain Districts in Nepal*
creatorThakur, K. K. ; Pant, G. R. ; Wang, L. ; Hill, C. A. ; Pogranichniy, R. M. ; Manandhar, S. ; Johnson, A. J.
ispartofZoonoses and Public Health, September 2012, Vol.59(6), pp.393-400
identifier
subjectJapanese Encephalitis Virus ; Arbovirus ; Pigs ; Reservoir ; Culex Mosquito
descriptionJapanese encephalitis was recently reported from individuals in the mountain districts of Nepal without travel history to Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) endemic areas. We performed a cross‐sectional study to estimate the seroprevalence of JEV in pigs and subsequently conducted a survey of farmers to identify risk factors associated with seropositivity. In July and August, 2010, 454 pig serum samples were collected and tested by competitive ELISA. Data from a 35‐question survey of 109 pig owners were analysed using multivariate logistic regression. Seventy‐six (16.7, 95% CI 13.6–20.4) pigs tested positive for anti‐JEV antibodies, none of which had been vaccinated against JEV or sourced from JEV endemic areas. Risk factors associated with JEV seropositivity were ‘summer abortion’, ‘wells as a water source’, ‘urban location’, ‘reported presence of mosquitoes’ and ‘lower elevation’. Our results suggest that JEV is likely circulating in the mountain districts of Nepal, and that locally acquired JEV should be considered a risk for residents and travellers in these areas.
source
version8
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontrib
0Thakur, K. K.
1Pant, G. R.
2Wang, L.
3Hill, C. A.
4Pogranichniy, R. M.
5Manandhar, S.
6Johnson, A. J.
titleSeroprevalence of Japanese Encephalitis Virus and Risk Factors Associated with Seropositivity in Pigs in Four Mountain Districts in Nepal*
descriptionJapanese encephalitis was recently reported from individuals in the mountain districts of Nepal without travel history to Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) endemic areas. We performed a cross‐sectional study to estimate the seroprevalence of JEV in pigs and subsequently conducted a survey of farmers to identify risk factors associated with seropositivity. In July and August, 2010, 454 pig serum samples were collected and tested by competitive ELISA. Data from a 35‐question survey of 109 pig owners were analysed using multivariate logistic regression. Seventy‐six (16.7, 95% CI 13.6–20.4) pigs tested positive for anti‐JEV antibodies, none of which had been vaccinated against JEV or sourced from JEV endemic areas. Risk factors associated with JEV seropositivity were ‘summer abortion’, ‘wells as a water source’, ‘urban location’, ‘reported presence of mosquitoes’ and ‘lower elevation’. Our results suggest that JEV is likely circulating in the mountain districts of Nepal, and that locally acquired JEV should be considered a risk for residents and travellers in these areas.
subject
0Japanese Encephalitis Virus
1Arbovirus
2Pigs
3Reservoir
4Culex Mosquito
general
0Blackwell Publishing Ltd
110.1111/j.1863-2378.2012.01456.x
2Wiley Online Library
sourceidwj
recordidwj10.1111/j.1863-2378.2012.01456.x
issn
01863-1959
118631959
21863-2378
318632378
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2012
addtitleZoonoses and Public Health
searchscope
0wj
1wiley
scope
0wj
1wiley
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pqid, pages, galeid]
sort
titleSeroprevalence of Japanese Encephalitis Virus and Risk Factors Associated with Seropositivity in Pigs in Four Mountain Districts in Nepal*
authorThakur, K. K. ; Pant, G. R. ; Wang, L. ; Hill, C. A. ; Pogranichniy, R. M. ; Manandhar, S. ; Johnson, A. J.
creationdate20120900
facets
frbrgroupid-934882001878515159
frbrtype5
creationdate2012
topic
0Japanese Encephalitis Virus
1Arbovirus
2Pigs
3Reservoir
4Culex Mosquito
collectionWiley Online Library
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Thakur, K. K.
1Pant, G. R.
2Wang, L.
3Hill, C. A.
4Pogranichniy, R. M.
5Manandhar, S.
6Johnson, A. J.
jtitleZoonoses and Public Health
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Thakur
1Pant
2Wang
3Hill
4Pogranichniy
5Manandhar
6Johnson
aufirst
0K. K.
1G. R.
2L.
3C. A.
4R. M.
5S.
6A. J.
au
0Thakur, K. K.
1Pant, G. R.
2Wang, L.
3Hill, C. A.
4Pogranichniy, R. M.
5Manandhar, S.
6Johnson, A. J.
atitleSeroprevalence of Japanese Encephalitis Virus and Risk Factors Associated with Seropositivity in Pigs in Four Mountain Districts in Nepal*
jtitleZoonoses and Public Health
risdate201209
volume59
issue6
spage393
epage400
issn1863-1959
eissn1863-2378
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractJapanese encephalitis was recently reported from individuals in the mountain districts of Nepal without travel history to Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) endemic areas. We performed a cross‐sectional study to estimate the seroprevalence of JEV in pigs and subsequently conducted a survey of farmers to identify risk factors associated with seropositivity. In July and August, 2010, 454 pig serum samples were collected and tested by competitive ELISA. Data from a 35‐question survey of 109 pig owners were analysed using multivariate logistic regression. Seventy‐six (16.7, 95% CI 13.6–20.4) pigs tested positive for anti‐JEV antibodies, none of which had been vaccinated against JEV or sourced from JEV endemic areas. Risk factors associated with JEV seropositivity were ‘summer abortion’, ‘wells as a water source’, ‘urban location’, ‘reported presence of mosquitoes’ and ‘lower elevation’. Our results suggest that JEV is likely circulating in the mountain districts of Nepal, and that locally acquired JEV should be considered a risk for residents and travellers in these areas.
copOxford, UK
pubBlackwell Publishing Ltd
doi10.1111/j.1863-2378.2012.01456.x
pages393-400
date2012-09