schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Does Marriage Moderate Genetic Effects on Delinquency and Violence?

Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health ( = 1,254), the authors investigated whether marriage can foster desistance from delinquency and violence by moderating genetic effects. In contrast to existing gene–environment research that typically focuses on one or a... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Marriage and Family October 2015, Vol.77(5), pp.1217-1233
Main Author: Li, Yi
Other Authors: Liu, Hexuan , Guo, Guang
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language:
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0022-2445 ; E-ISSN: 1741-3737 ; DOI: 10.1111/jomf.12208
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: wj10.1111/jomf.12208
title: Does Marriage Moderate Genetic Effects on Delinquency and Violence?
format: Article
creator:
  • Li, Yi
  • Liu, Hexuan
  • Guo, Guang
subjects:
  • Aggression
  • Marriage
  • National Longitudinal Study Of Adolescent To Adult Health Add Health
  • Youth/Emergent Adulthood
ispartof: Journal of Marriage and Family, October 2015, Vol.77(5), pp.1217-1233
description: Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health ( = 1,254), the authors investigated whether marriage can foster desistance from delinquency and violence by moderating genetic effects. In contrast to existing gene–environment research that typically focuses on one or a few genetic polymorphisms, they extended a recently developed mixed linear model to consider the collective influence of 580 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 64 genes related to aggression and risky behavior. The mixed linear model estimates the proportion of variance in the phenotype that is explained by the single nucleotide polymorphisms. The authors found that the proportion of variance in delinquency/violence explained was smaller among married individuals than unmarried individuals. Because selection, confounding, and heterogeneity may bias the estimate of the Gene × Marriage interaction, they conducted a series of analyses to address these issues. The findings suggest that the Gene × Marriage interaction results were not seriously affected by these issues.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0022-2445 ; E-ISSN: 1741-3737 ; DOI: 10.1111/jomf.12208
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0022-2445
  • 00222445
  • 1741-3737
  • 17413737
url: Link


@attributes
ID207372853
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid10.1111/jomf.12208
sourceidwj
recordidTN_wj10.1111/jomf.12208
sourcesystemPC
pqid1721359127
display
typearticle
titleDoes Marriage Moderate Genetic Effects on Delinquency and Violence?
creatorLi, Yi ; Liu, Hexuan ; Guo, Guang
ispartofJournal of Marriage and Family, October 2015, Vol.77(5), pp.1217-1233
identifier
subjectAggression ; Marriage ; National Longitudinal Study Of Adolescent To Adult Health Add Health ; Youth/Emergent Adulthood
descriptionUsing data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health ( = 1,254), the authors investigated whether marriage can foster desistance from delinquency and violence by moderating genetic effects. In contrast to existing gene–environment research that typically focuses on one or a few genetic polymorphisms, they extended a recently developed mixed linear model to consider the collective influence of 580 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 64 genes related to aggression and risky behavior. The mixed linear model estimates the proportion of variance in the phenotype that is explained by the single nucleotide polymorphisms. The authors found that the proportion of variance in delinquency/violence explained was smaller among married individuals than unmarried individuals. Because selection, confounding, and heterogeneity may bias the estimate of the Gene × Marriage interaction, they conducted a series of analyses to address these issues. The findings suggest that the Gene × Marriage interaction results were not seriously affected by these issues.
source
version6
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontrib
0Li, Yi
1Liu, Hexuan
2Guo, Guang
titleDoes Marriage Moderate Genetic Effects on Delinquency and Violence?
descriptionUsing data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health ( = 1,254), the authors investigated whether marriage can foster desistance from delinquency and violence by moderating genetic effects. In contrast to existing gene–environment research that typically focuses on one or a few genetic polymorphisms, they extended a recently developed mixed linear model to consider the collective influence of 580 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 64 genes related to aggression and risky behavior. The mixed linear model estimates the proportion of variance in the phenotype that is explained by the single nucleotide polymorphisms. The authors found that the proportion of variance in delinquency/violence explained was smaller among married individuals than unmarried individuals. Because selection, confounding, and heterogeneity may bias the estimate of the Gene × Marriage interaction, they conducted a series of analyses to address these issues. The findings suggest that the Gene × Marriage interaction results were not seriously affected by these issues.
subject
0Aggression
1Marriage
2National Longitudinal Study Of Adolescent To Adult Health Add Health
3Youth/Emergent Adulthood
general
0Wiley Subscription Services, Inc.
110.1111/jomf.12208
2Wiley Online Library
sourceidwj
recordidwj10.1111/jomf.12208
issn
00022-2445
100222445
21741-3737
317413737
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2015
addtitle
0Journal of Marriage and Family
1Fam Relat
searchscope
0wj
1wiley
scope
0wj
1wiley
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pages, pqid]
sort
titleDoes Marriage Moderate Genetic Effects on Delinquency and Violence?
authorLi, Yi ; Liu, Hexuan ; Guo, Guang
creationdate20151000
facets
frbrgroupid7380116728992008028
frbrtype5
creationdate2015
topic
0Aggression
1Marriage
2National Longitudinal Study Of Adolescent To Adult Health Add Health
3Youth/Emergent Adulthood
collectionWiley Online Library
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Li, Yi
1Liu, Hexuan
2Guo, Guang
jtitleJournal of Marriage and Family
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Li
1Liu
2Guo
aufirst
0Yi
1Hexuan
2Guang
au
0Li, Yi
1Liu, Hexuan
2Guo, Guang
atitleDoes Marriage Moderate Genetic Effects on Delinquency and Violence?
jtitleJournal of Marriage and Family
risdate201510
volume77
issue5
spage1217
epage1233
issn0022-2445
eissn1741-3737
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractUsing data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health ( = 1,254), the authors investigated whether marriage can foster desistance from delinquency and violence by moderating genetic effects. In contrast to existing gene–environment research that typically focuses on one or a few genetic polymorphisms, they extended a recently developed mixed linear model to consider the collective influence of 580 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 64 genes related to aggression and risky behavior. The mixed linear model estimates the proportion of variance in the phenotype that is explained by the single nucleotide polymorphisms. The authors found that the proportion of variance in delinquency/violence explained was smaller among married individuals than unmarried individuals. Because selection, confounding, and heterogeneity may bias the estimate of the Gene × Marriage interaction, they conducted a series of analyses to address these issues. The findings suggest that the Gene × Marriage interaction results were not seriously affected by these issues.
copHoboken, USA
pubWiley Subscription Services, Inc.
doi10.1111/jomf.12208
pages1217-1233
date2015-10