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Beyond the P aleolithic prescription: incorporating diversity and flexibility in the study of human diet evolution

Evolutionary paradigms of human health and nutrition center on the evolutionary discordance or “mismatch” model in which human bodies, reflecting adaptations established in the aleolithic era, are ill‐suited to modern industrialized diets, resulting in rapidly increasing rates of chronic metabolic d... Full description

Journal Title: Nutrition Reviews August 2013, Vol.71(8), pp.501-510
Main Author: Turner, Bethany L
Other Authors: Thompson, Amanda L
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 0029-6643 ; E-ISSN: 1753-4887 ; DOI: 10.1111/nure.12039
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recordid: wj10.1111/nure.12039
title: Beyond the P aleolithic prescription: incorporating diversity and flexibility in the study of human diet evolution
format: Article
creator:
  • Turner, Bethany L
  • Thompson, Amanda L
subjects:
  • Diet
  • Food Choice
  • Gut Microflora
  • Human Evolution
  • Mismatch
  • Niche Construction
  • Paleolithic Diet
ispartof: Nutrition Reviews, August 2013, Vol.71(8), pp.501-510
description: Evolutionary paradigms of human health and nutrition center on the evolutionary discordance or “mismatch” model in which human bodies, reflecting adaptations established in the aleolithic era, are ill‐suited to modern industrialized diets, resulting in rapidly increasing rates of chronic metabolic disease. Though this model remains useful, its utility in explaining the evolution of human dietary tendencies is limited. The assumption that human diets are mismatched to the evolved biology of humans implies that the human diet is instinctual or genetically determined and rooted in the aleolithic era. This review looks at current research indicating that human eating habits are learned primarily through behavioral, social, and physiological mechanisms that start in utero and extend throughout the life course. Adaptations that appear to be strongly genetic likely reflect eolithic, rather than aleolithic, adaptations and are significantly influenced by human niche‐constructing behavior. Several examples are used to conclude that incorporating a broader understanding of both the evolved mechanisms by which humans learn and imprint eating habits and the reciprocal effects of those habits on physiology would provide useful tools for structuring more lasting nutrition interventions.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0029-6643 ; E-ISSN: 1753-4887 ; DOI: 10.1111/nure.12039
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0029-6643
  • 00296643
  • 1753-4887
  • 17534887
url: Link


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subjectDiet ; Food Choice ; Gut Microflora ; Human Evolution ; Mismatch ; Niche Construction ; Paleolithic Diet
descriptionEvolutionary paradigms of human health and nutrition center on the evolutionary discordance or “mismatch” model in which human bodies, reflecting adaptations established in the aleolithic era, are ill‐suited to modern industrialized diets, resulting in rapidly increasing rates of chronic metabolic disease. Though this model remains useful, its utility in explaining the evolution of human dietary tendencies is limited. The assumption that human diets are mismatched to the evolved biology of humans implies that the human diet is instinctual or genetically determined and rooted in the aleolithic era. This review looks at current research indicating that human eating habits are learned primarily through behavioral, social, and physiological mechanisms that start in utero and extend throughout the life course. Adaptations that appear to be strongly genetic likely reflect eolithic, rather than aleolithic, adaptations and are significantly influenced by human niche‐constructing behavior. Several examples are used to conclude that incorporating a broader understanding of both the evolved mechanisms by which humans learn and imprint eating habits and the reciprocal effects of those habits on physiology would provide useful tools for structuring more lasting nutrition interventions.
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abstractEvolutionary paradigms of human health and nutrition center on the evolutionary discordance or “mismatch” model in which human bodies, reflecting adaptations established in the aleolithic era, are ill‐suited to modern industrialized diets, resulting in rapidly increasing rates of chronic metabolic disease. Though this model remains useful, its utility in explaining the evolution of human dietary tendencies is limited. The assumption that human diets are mismatched to the evolved biology of humans implies that the human diet is instinctual or genetically determined and rooted in the aleolithic era. This review looks at current research indicating that human eating habits are learned primarily through behavioral, social, and physiological mechanisms that start in utero and extend throughout the life course. Adaptations that appear to be strongly genetic likely reflect eolithic, rather than aleolithic, adaptations and are significantly influenced by human niche‐constructing behavior. Several examples are used to conclude that incorporating a broader understanding of both the evolved mechanisms by which humans learn and imprint eating habits and the reciprocal effects of those habits on physiology would provide useful tools for structuring more lasting nutrition interventions.
doi10.1111/nure.12039
pages501-10
date2013-08