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Importance of government policies and other influences in transforming global diets

The econd nternational onference on utrition, organized by the ood and griculture rganization of the nited ations and the orld ealth rganization, will take place in ovember 2014. In 1992, the First International Conference on Nutrition declared, “Hunger and malnutrition are unacceptable.” Twenty‐two... Full description

Journal Title: Nutrition Reviews September 2014, Vol.72(9), pp.591-604
Main Author: Traill, W Bruce
Other Authors: Mazzocchi, Mario , Shankar, Bhavani , Hallam, David
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 0029-6643 ; E-ISSN: 1753-4887 ; DOI: 10.1111/nure.12134
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recordid: wj10.1111/nure.12134
title: Importance of government policies and other influences in transforming global diets
format: Article
creator:
  • Traill, W Bruce
  • Mazzocchi, Mario
  • Shankar, Bhavani
  • Hallam, David
subjects:
  • Diet
  • Food
  • Globalization
  • Policy
ispartof: Nutrition Reviews, September 2014, Vol.72(9), pp.591-604
description: The econd nternational onference on utrition, organized by the ood and griculture rganization of the nited ations and the orld ealth rganization, will take place in ovember 2014. In 1992, the First International Conference on Nutrition declared, “Hunger and malnutrition are unacceptable.” Twenty‐two years later, it is timely to revisit the state of global nutrition and examine the forces that have brought change to diets worldwide. Calorie availability has increased throughout the world, even in the least‐developed countries, where per capita availability has grown by 10%. As a consequence, the proportion of undernourished people has fallen, yet obesity has emerged as a major public health concern, primarily in developed countries but also among the growing middle classes in middle‐ and low‐income countries. Globally, the nutrition transition has been affected by increased intakes of livestock products, processed foods, and fast foods. These changes are most readily explained by economic growth, urbanization, and globalization. International trade and liberalization of investment have been the key policy drivers of dietary change.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0029-6643 ; E-ISSN: 1753-4887 ; DOI: 10.1111/nure.12134
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0029-6643
  • 00296643
  • 1753-4887
  • 17534887
url: Link


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descriptionThe econd nternational onference on utrition, organized by the ood and griculture rganization of the nited ations and the orld ealth rganization, will take place in ovember 2014. In 1992, the First International Conference on Nutrition declared, “Hunger and malnutrition are unacceptable.” Twenty‐two years later, it is timely to revisit the state of global nutrition and examine the forces that have brought change to diets worldwide. Calorie availability has increased throughout the world, even in the least‐developed countries, where per capita availability has grown by 10%. As a consequence, the proportion of undernourished people has fallen, yet obesity has emerged as a major public health concern, primarily in developed countries but also among the growing middle classes in middle‐ and low‐income countries. Globally, the nutrition transition has been affected by increased intakes of livestock products, processed foods, and fast foods. These changes are most readily explained by economic growth, urbanization, and globalization. International trade and liberalization of investment have been the key policy drivers of dietary change.
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abstractThe econd nternational onference on utrition, organized by the ood and griculture rganization of the nited ations and the orld ealth rganization, will take place in ovember 2014. In 1992, the First International Conference on Nutrition declared, “Hunger and malnutrition are unacceptable.” Twenty‐two years later, it is timely to revisit the state of global nutrition and examine the forces that have brought change to diets worldwide. Calorie availability has increased throughout the world, even in the least‐developed countries, where per capita availability has grown by 10%. As a consequence, the proportion of undernourished people has fallen, yet obesity has emerged as a major public health concern, primarily in developed countries but also among the growing middle classes in middle‐ and low‐income countries. Globally, the nutrition transition has been affected by increased intakes of livestock products, processed foods, and fast foods. These changes are most readily explained by economic growth, urbanization, and globalization. International trade and liberalization of investment have been the key policy drivers of dietary change.
doi10.1111/nure.12134
pages591-604
date2014-09