schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

“I Have Chosen the Flaming Death”: The Forgotten Self‐Immolation of Alice Herz

In March 1965, 82‐year‐old peace activist Alice Herz immolated herself in opposition to military action in Vietnam. Her protest followed similar public displays by Vietnamese Buddhists, but was an unprecedented form of protest in the United States. However, while it provoked sympathy from internatio... Full description

Journal Title: Peace & Change January 2018, Vol.43(1), pp.32-60
Main Author: Coburn, Jon
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language:
Subjects:
Law
ID: ISSN: 0149-0508 ; E-ISSN: 1468-0130 ; DOI: 10.1111/pech.12273
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: wj10.1111/pech.12273
title: “I Have Chosen the Flaming Death”: The Forgotten Self‐Immolation of Alice Herz
format: Article
creator:
  • Coburn, Jon
subjects:
  • International Relations
  • Law
ispartof: Peace & Change, January 2018, Vol.43(1), pp.32-60
description: In March 1965, 82‐year‐old peace activist Alice Herz immolated herself in opposition to military action in Vietnam. Her protest followed similar public displays by Vietnamese Buddhists, but was an unprecedented form of protest in the United States. However, while it provoked sympathy from international observers, the public reacted with ambivalence. Herz's legacy subsequently became overshadowed after Norman Morrison's identical protest in November that year. This article accounts for the multiple reactions to Alice Herz's forgotten self‐immolation. It examines both the international and domestic context to highlight the cultural norms, political context, gender dynamics, and performative factors that influenced responses to the act. Using Morrison's example to show how responses were formed, this article reveals that because Herz did not receive contemporary interest she has been overlooked historically.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0149-0508 ; E-ISSN: 1468-0130 ; DOI: 10.1111/pech.12273
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0149-0508
  • 01490508
  • 1468-0130
  • 14680130
url: Link


@attributes
ID1474427299
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid10.1111/pech.12273
sourceidwj
recordidTN_wj10.1111/pech.12273
sourcesystemPC
pqid2002601656
galeid527889687
display
typearticle
title“I Have Chosen the Flaming Death”: The Forgotten Self‐Immolation of Alice Herz
creatorCoburn, Jon
ispartofPeace & Change, January 2018, Vol.43(1), pp.32-60
identifier
descriptionIn March 1965, 82‐year‐old peace activist Alice Herz immolated herself in opposition to military action in Vietnam. Her protest followed similar public displays by Vietnamese Buddhists, but was an unprecedented form of protest in the United States. However, while it provoked sympathy from international observers, the public reacted with ambivalence. Herz's legacy subsequently became overshadowed after Norman Morrison's identical protest in November that year. This article accounts for the multiple reactions to Alice Herz's forgotten self‐immolation. It examines both the international and domestic context to highlight the cultural norms, political context, gender dynamics, and performative factors that influenced responses to the act. Using Morrison's example to show how responses were formed, this article reveals that because Herz did not receive contemporary interest she has been overlooked historically.
source
subjectInternational Relations ; Law;
version4
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontribCoburn, Jon
title“I Have Chosen the Flaming Death”: The Forgotten Self‐Immolation of Alice Herz
descriptionIn March 1965, 82‐year‐old peace activist Alice Herz immolated herself in opposition to military action in Vietnam. Her protest followed similar public displays by Vietnamese Buddhists, but was an unprecedented form of protest in the United States. However, while it provoked sympathy from international observers, the public reacted with ambivalence. Herz's legacy subsequently became overshadowed after Norman Morrison's identical protest in November that year. This article accounts for the multiple reactions to Alice Herz's forgotten self‐immolation. It examines both the international and domestic context to highlight the cultural norms, political context, gender dynamics, and performative factors that influenced responses to the act. Using Morrison's example to show how responses were formed, this article reveals that because Herz did not receive contemporary interest she has been overlooked historically.
general
010.1111/pech.12273
1Wiley Online Library
sourceidwj
recordidwj10.1111/pech.12273
issn
00149-0508
101490508
21468-0130
314680130
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2018
addtitle
0Peace & Change
1Peace Change
searchscope
0wj
1wiley
scope
0wj
1wiley
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pqid, pages, galeid, subject]
sort
title“I Have Chosen the Flaming Death”: The Forgotten Self‐Immolation of Alice Herz
authorCoburn, Jon
creationdate20180100
facets
frbrgroupid7441349984817738332
frbrtype5
newrecords20180222
creationdate2018
collectionWiley Online Library
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontribCoburn, Jon
jtitlePeace & Change
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulastCoburn
aufirstJon
auCoburn, Jon
atitle“I Have Chosen the Flaming Death”: The Forgotten Self‐Immolation of Alice Herz
jtitlePeace & Change
risdate201801
volume43
issue1
spage32
epage60
issn0149-0508
eissn1468-0130
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractIn March 1965, 82‐year‐old peace activist Alice Herz immolated herself in opposition to military action in Vietnam. Her protest followed similar public displays by Vietnamese Buddhists, but was an unprecedented form of protest in the United States. However, while it provoked sympathy from international observers, the public reacted with ambivalence. Herz's legacy subsequently became overshadowed after Norman Morrison's identical protest in November that year. This article accounts for the multiple reactions to Alice Herz's forgotten self‐immolation. It examines both the international and domestic context to highlight the cultural norms, political context, gender dynamics, and performative factors that influenced responses to the act. Using Morrison's example to show how responses were formed, this article reveals that because Herz did not receive contemporary interest she has been overlooked historically.
doi10.1111/pech.12273
pages32-60
date2018-01